Leaves of Wasabi

This is not a meal… This morning, I went to this market place and they taught us how to make *tsukemono* (pickles) with leaves of wasabi.
Wasabi is the green Japanese horseradish. The grated root is often presented with sushi.

The recipe we used :

wasabi leaves tsukemono

1 bunch of wasabi leaves
salt 1 ts (5g)
ice cubes

Broth :
soy sauce 50 ml
sake 25 ml
mirin 1 tbs (15 ml)
sugar 1tbs (15 g)

Cut the leaves in chunks of about 1 or 2 cm, cut the stalks in bits of 2 or 3 mm or thinner. Wash them in fresh water.
Throw them into boiling water a few seconds. Drain and refresh in iced water. Squeeze well and rub with the salt.
Prepare the broth by mixing all the ingredients, bring to a boil, then refresh by bathing the pan in the bath of iced water. Pour on the leaves. Store in sealed containers (or vinyl bags). Refrigerate.
The tsukemono can be eaten from the second day and kept about one week (possibly 2 weeks, that depends how carefully and cleanly you prepared them).
The teacher said that to keep them longer, you can freeze them (inside the container). They are good 2 or 3 days after defrosting.

13 thoughts on “Leaves of Wasabi

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    • I have never seen them in nature. The wasabi plant grows in marshes and probably only in Japan and Korea area, so it’s rare in other places. Maybe you know mustard greens. It’s different in taste, but the same type of recipes can be used.

    • The recipe we used :

      wasabi leaves tsukemono

      1 bunch of wasabi leaves
      salt 1 ts (5g)
      ice cubes

      Broth :
      soy sauce 50 ml
      sake 25 ml
      mirin 1 tbs (15 ml)
      sugar 1tbs (15 g)

      Cut the leaves in chunks of about 1 or 2 cm, cut the stalks in bits of 2 or 3 mm or thinner. Wash them in fresh water.
      Throw them into boiling water a few seconds. Drain and refresh in iced water. Squeeze well and rub with the salt.
      Prepare the broth by mixing all the ingredients, bring to a boil, then refresh by bathing the pan in the bath of iced water. Pour on the leaves. Store in sealed containers (or vinyl bags). Refrigerate.
      The tsukemono can be eaten from the second day and kept about one week (possibly 2 weeks, that depends how carefully and cleanly you prepared them).
      The teacher said that to keep them longer, you can freeze them (inside the container). They are good 2 or 3 days after defrosting.

  4. This sounds good. I have done it before using vinegar and that turned out OK. I will need to go and harvest some leaves and give this method a go. 🙂

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