Home-made condiments : karashi miso for jajamen.

Gourmande’s green chili karashi miso. The sauce to make :

Jajamen (click here).

How many sauces and sauce bases do you need in your kitchen ? Er… 476, 477… It’s endless.
You run all over town to find them, they won’t be cheap, and/or you get will them in a bucket and to use it up before it’s stale, you would have cook with it daily for 6 persons. And the list of ingredients can be scary.

The thing is there are some sauces that can’t make at home. I am not making my soy sauce nor my nuoc nam. Some are not so quick and easy to make. I don’t make my vinegars, but I could.
Many are a combination of simpler ingredients that you already have in your closet. Or if you buy the ingredients, you can use them in many different recipes.

Note that there “karashi” means mustard usually, but it can mean “hot spice”. “Togarashi” means chili pepper. You don’t care… but well, if you eat Japanese food, they may serve you a mustard based sauce also called “karashi miso”.

Togarashi . It’s a frozen Korean chili. A hot one.

Gourmande’s green chili karashi miso

2 tbs of brown chunky wheat miso
1 tbs of black hatcho miso
1 fresh green hot chili
1 tbs of kurozato (Okinawan black cane sugar)
1 cup of sake
2 cups of water

+ 2 tbs of fragrant sesame oil

Open the chili, get rid of the seeds and white parts. Mince finely the flesh. Put all the ingredients except the oil in a sauce pan. With a spatula, mix well the miso. Bring to boil, simmer about 20 minutes, till half of water is gone.
Add the oil, continue 2 minutes on low it while stirring.
You can use immediately or keep it a while in a jar in your fridge.

I find it convenient to prepare it for 1 chili, but it doesn’t matter how much you make in a batch. You get about 1 cup. It’s well for a dozen of servings.

Use : jajamen, and to flavor stir-fries, Asian sauces, etc. It is closed to Chinese sauce doubanjang (tobanjan), so it can replace it in most recipes.

Of course, you can substitute chili pepper, sugar, sake (alcohol)… to adapt to the ingredients you can find.

MISO

Miso is a salty paste of longly fermented grains, and soy. It’s often mix. They are not all equivalent. The ingredients differ greatly and taste too.
They are often sold in boxes/packs of 500g. They can last one year in the fridge if you close well the package. If you buy only one, take it brown. With one of each of these 3, you can do most Japanese recipes :

White colored = sweet

White miso (chunky).
It contains lots of rice, a little soy. It is naturally very sweet. The higher % of rice, the sweeter and whiter. Some smooth version have even added sweetener.

Brown colored = a little strong

Wheat miso. This one contains wheat and soy. Other brown ones contain rice and soy.

Black color = strong

Hatcho miso, hacho miso. Only soy. The paste is black. It is used to make “red” miso soup. On the photo, it is “diluted”. You buy it as a thick paste.

The ones that appear to be black and dark beige to brown have some bitterness that you want for this sauce. The very light colored types of miso are very sweet, not so well here. The texture of miso, chunky or smooth matters less as they pound or pass the chunky in a blender, it’s the same thing. I like my sauce with chunky texture.

7 thoughts on “Home-made condiments : karashi miso for jajamen.

  1. Pingback: Home-made condiments : karashi miso for jajamen. (via Gourmande in Osaka) | Vegetale in Osaka

  2. Pingback: Kamo-negi udon, fork friendly | Gourmande in Osaka

  3. Pingback: Seki-noa | Gourmande in Osaka

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