Mandarin mikan daifuku mochi

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丸ごとみかん大福 marugoto mikan daifuku is a currently popular daifuku mochi tea sweet. It’s a cousin of the now classic ichigo daifuku.

Most *bakers* wrap the mikans with shiroan white bean paste, but I really like the anko red bean paste and mikan orange pairing.
For the recipes to make the mochi and paste refer to this post (click).

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Mikan, Japanese mandarin orange. The early ones have a green skin. Now, they are becoming really sweet.

Azuki beans to prepare tsubuan sweet bean paste.

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With kurozato black sugar.

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Serve fresh. Then cut :

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A lighning of green tea : matcha éclairs

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Des éclairs au thé matcha. A flash of light in the middle of rainy season. Un éclair is a lightning during a storm. And this dessert…

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Green tea version.

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Same crust as the petits choux (recipe here), but longer.

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The filling is very Japanese at the base with matcha (green tea for ceremony) and shiro an (paste made of white beans and sugar), with gives a matcha an (green tea cream).

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About this paste.

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… I creamed it with coconut cream, and added a little brandy for flavor. They look rustic as it’s a week-day snack so I didn’t smoothen my cream with the sieve and I didn’t pipe the dough. Do that for guests !

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On top, sugar and matcha green tea.

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They call me ‘shoe cream’… Puff cake blues.

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Les choux à la crème are probably the most successful French cake in Japan. Chou was easy to pronounce, but à la crème was too long. Everybody knew that meant cream. So the name became シュークリーム shu-kuri-mu chou cream, which is also how they say “shoe cream”.

Well we can see them everywhere from the luxury hotel tea room to the discount kombini (convenience store). They can be extraordinary, great, good, meh, abominable. The choice is huge. Some stands prepare them fresh all day.
I still find home-made fresher.

First let’s make the little choux. Then a cream at local taste including anko (azuki bean sweet paste) an ingredient borrowed from wagashi (Japanese tea sweets).

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Simple, 125 g of water, 25 g of oil, 80 g of flour. I included about 2 eggs, a little vanilla extract and sugar.

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Baked at 200 degrees, 25 minutes.

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I really love the inside still wet. So I don’t fill them, I keep the cream on the side.

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I passed boiled azuki beans through a sieve to get the creamy texture, added sugar and a little brandy. That’s koshian (‘passed’ bean paste, recipe here). More about it here.

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The whip (here veg’) plus anko bean paste mix. It is very popular now.

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Baba Osaka

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Today’s baba is very Japanese. The biscuit is soaked in matcha green tea, and it is topped with an anko sweet bean paste.
I had a few mini-savarin left, getting stale (see recipe here).

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I soaked the babas in thick sweetened matcha (green tea for ceremony). Let overnight.

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I had no azuki beans in stock, so I’ve used other red beans (taisho kintoki beans), sweetened with vanilla sugar.

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That’s it. I’ve sprinkled a little more matcha and sugar on top.

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The baba was fully soaked, but weirdly the color didn’t pass everywhere.

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Sakura an-pan, blossom sweet bread

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The sweet bread of the season is topped with a cherry blossom !

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It’s seasonal variation of anpan, a kashipan (Japanese sweet bread) filled with anko sweet bean paste. :

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A sweet bread dough : 1 ts of yeast, 3 tbs of kurozato black sugar, 2 cups of AP flour, enough tonyu (home-made soy milk) to wet that. I’ve mixed it in the home-bakery machine.
Filled with sakura an paste and shaped.

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DIY sakura bean paste (click here)

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Baked 20 minutes at 180 C. OK, the shapes are… what they are.

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Only one had a perfect aspect, but they were all delicious. I didn’t make enough.

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Waffle sands under the cherry blossoms

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Double sakura waffles. Both the waffle and its filling have a delicate cherry blossom flavor. It’s the perfect snack for the season. It’s very quickly made.

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DIY sakura leaf powder : I’ve left rinsed pickled sakura leaves dry. Then I crushed them with my finger.

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I mixed them with flour, baking powder, a little kurozato black sugar, soy milk. Cooked waffles.

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Took out my sakura-an cream to garnish.

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Cut into triangle sands.

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Prepared my basket, with a thermos of sencha green tea. And I went to eat them at the nearby park… The wind froze me, I was glad to have tea to thaw me.

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Crème de sakura (sakura an)

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桜餡sakura an is the girlie version of anko, the classic sweet bean paste used to make Japanese sweets.

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It is traditionally flavored with pickled sakura.

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Dried daifuku mame. They are big white beans, very convenient to make Japanese sweets.

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After soaking and cooking.

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1. Paste the beans.
2. Add color (beni koji for red) and syrup or sugar. I also add a little brandy.
3. Pass the paste through a sieve.
4. Add pickled minced sakura leaves (for strong taste) and/or flowers (for lighter taste and pink bits in the mass).
5. Let a few hours, so the paste takes the full flavor.

The pickled sakura must be rinsed and soaked, otherwise they are really too salty.

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That’s the finished paste. It can be used in sweets and breads.

DSC07698-001 With the rest of paste that didn’t pass the filtering, and some leftover of anko bean paste, I made a toast.

Wagashi Saga : Japanese sweet posts and tutorials.

Recipes using sakura-an :
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