Abalone four ways

Last year’s abalone/awabi/ormeau series :

cleaning and cutting abalone

ormeau au beurre (French style buttered abalone)

Korean abalone royal soup

Awabi to kimo (Japanese style)

Abalone ink pasta

Abalone ink pasta

A delicious sauce for pasta. It is made with the innards of octopus I didn’t use in this recipe :

Ormeau au beurre

I stir-fried the octopus livers and all bits that were not used in olive oil with garlic, onion, hot chili. Added red paprika, a little basil.

Then the al dente pasta and a few slices of octopus…
Yummy… I had to lick the plate and the frying pan after.

Awabi to kimo in buttered soy sauce (abalone, Japanese style)

That’s really delicious. A Japanese recipe for awabi (abalone). It is stir-fried with its kimo. It’s liver… no stay ! Wait, it’s really good.

I prepared the awabi as I’ve seen in with this video and the recipe is shown from the 5th minute.

The black bit is liver. That’s the tastiest part. Even if you don’t like liver, even fish liver, try it, it tastes like nothing else.
How to : Take the black cone that is the liver of abalone. Melt butter. Fry the liver in it till it loses shape. Stir in a few veggies.

Then at the end your sliced abalone, a bit of salt and a little soy sauce. You don’t need to cook the abalone much, one minute is enough.

Serve them in the shells :

Mmmmm ! That’s probably one of the best recipes to enjoy abalone.

And now, heal your tummy with Korean abalone soup

Eating certain shellfish is good for your liver, particularly if you have been over-indulging in rich foods and drinks. Abalone is one of them. So jeonbokjuk is the ideal dish for the season. It can be translated as “Korean abalone rice porrdige” and is a specialty of Cheju Island and of anywhere else in South Korea too.

This Gourmande version is totally unauthentic but it’s inspired from a recipe from Pusan. Eat as you like with kimchi, gochujang sauce, negi leeks, sesame seeds.

The recipes takes a whole abalone. There are variations that don’t use the liver and that’s your only choice if you use canned abalone. But if you have a fresh shellfish, use everything you get. Don’t worry about the color.

The liver is first stir-fried with a mirepoix of vegetables (here garlic, onion, carrot). Then the bits of abalone are added. Then soaked rice and water. I have used whole rice. I have added stalks of asparagus and a little sea salt later.

A dish for a king. I didn’t know I need healing before, but now I feel healed. That should be my brunch every morning.

Ormeau au beurre (buttered abalone)

The beast is an abalone. It’s getting rare in Europe, a luxury these days. Today, I have won the lottery. Oh wait, let me check my ticket… nope, I haven’t bought any ticket.
It seems we have a few more of these shellfish left in Asia, particularly in South-Korea. Also, they farm them. So it’s not insanely expensive, it’s just expensive. And fishmongers sell everything in the last hour before closing the store, especially if they will close for the New-Year holiday. So I went there at the right time and yeah ! I CAUGHT A BARGAIN !

This Japanese blogger shows how to deal with them. I was totally clueless.

I link his video. He washes them with rough salt. The second part is about cooking them with their liver, see next post.
There will be 3 other posts about abalone (ormeau, awabi…) in the next days :

Korean abalone royal soup

Awabi to kimo (Japanese style)

Abalone ink pasta

So I cut them as the Japanese guy did. And I prepared one French style. I clarified butter (melt it in a frying pan, skimmed the white bits, let dry a bit on low it). And I added pan-fried the abalone with a little sea salt. Just a little black pepper on top.