Sashimi lunch

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A classic Japanese meal around a dish of sashimi. I prepared the sides.

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Steamed kabocha pumpkin and ninniku no me garlic stalks. With soy sauce.

**I simply place the veggies in a steaming basket on top of a boiling water pot, or in the steaming mode of the microwave. Thin kabocha slices take 8 to 10 minutes. Garlic stalks only need 3 o 4 minutes to be at my taste. I add sesame seeds and soy sauce when I serve them.

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The sashimi : ika (calamari), buri (yellow tail) and ama ebi (nordic shrimps).

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An umeboshi (salted plum).

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Tofu with oboro kombu (seaweed), seasoned with the soy sauce left after the sashimi dipping.

**How to choose or make tofu.

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The miso soup with hijiki seaweed, shimeji mushrooms and kintoki red carrots.

Making miso soup

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Add rice. That’s a complete Japanese menu.

**Cooking Japanese rice

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Ika to ikashiokara no nimono (calamari with calamari)

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The photos don’t always reveal the truth about the taste but that was particularly delicious today. That’s a simmered seafood dish a little unusual. I have used calamari in two states, fresh and as shiokarai.
Well how can I explain all the poetry of shiokarai seafood on a blog ? You should see it, smell it, try it. It has a very strong fermented iodine flavor. I am not sure most people would like it.

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イカの塩辛ika no shiokarai is the complete name, often shortenened in ikashiokara‎ too. “shiokarai” calamari. Shiokarai means salty, very salty, too salty. So it’s raw calamari, salted and fermented in its brine with its ink. Here is an example of how it is made (click). I buy it if possible, because I tend to fail when I make it… and it’s cheap and sold everywhere in Osaka. Someday we’ll even have vending machines.
The only problem of this food is it’s extremely salty, so you eat it in very small amount, a teaspoon maximum on the side of your meal or on your bowl of rice. That’s why I wanted to add more volume to it.

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A fresh calamar that has released its ink. No problem, I didn’t need it. I simply cleaned and cut it.

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First, I cooked in a little oil, onion, garlic, ginger, the calamari. Then I’ve added 1 tbs of ikashiokara and 2 glasses of white wine (rather sweet, otherwise a little sugar would be welcome).Let simmer and reduce. Added more fresh ginger after 30 minutes.

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It’s ready when the calamari is tender (that takes about 40 minutes). The red color comes naturally.

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Small aubergines, steamed then grilled. No seasoning is needed because they are excellent just grilled and the dish is still very salty.

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A side of kuri gohan (chestnut rice).

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Kikuna chrysanthemum greens and shikwasa island lime to refresh the plate.

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La mer. French sea dishes ( compilation)

Menu to navigate in the sea of French main dishes…

papillote de crystal saumon et pomélo (salmon papillote)
papillote de poisson (white fish)
papillote de poisson vanillée (vanilla fish)

Winter bouillabaisse
Summer bouillabaisse
aioli aux pommes de terre nouvelles (with cod fish)
bourride de limande et amaguri
fish cassoulet
choucroute de la mer (seafood Sauerkraut)

morue parmentière (cod and potatoes)
effeuillée de morue parmentière (cod and potato gratin)

calamars au vin (wine stewed calamari)
calamar à l’armoricaine (calamari stew)

carpaccio de daurade au pamplemousse (grapefruit marinated fish)
pétoncles à la nage (mini scallop soup)
ormeaux au beurre (buttered abalone)
salade tahitienne (Tahitian raw fish)
féroce d’avocat (avocado cod)

sole meunière
Mediterranean grilled fish
saumon vapeur aux algues (steamed salmon)
daurade flambée au pastis (anise baked fish)

September’s round up

A little retrospective about last month.
In September, the readers’ favorites are :

Sprouted hemp seed bread, improved version
Simple 10 minute falafels
Milk your beans (make soy milk)
Eating like a queen : bouchée à la reine
Yaki ika, Ika yaki (Japanese calamari)
Kabocha and carrot kibbeh

*******
Sweets :

Farz fou ! Crazy pagan baking.

Guilt free chocolate cake
Kabocha polka-dot yokan

Hey, the kabocha is getting popular as Autumn is looming…

Some more :

Click here.
Click here.
Click here.
Click here.
Click here.
Click here.
Click here.
Click here.
Click here.
Click here.

Desserts :

Click here.
Click here.
Click here.
Click here.
Click here.

Arròs negre, black is the new rice…


That’s another style, the black paella. But it’s called arròs negre meaning black rice. The color is of course calamari ink.

other paella posts

I’ve used brown rice and made it small size in a pie dish. That dish was too thin to go directly on my induction stove, it was starting to melt… so I have placed it on the cast iron plancha.

That’s how I made it. I used a dose of nero di sepia (bought) and the juice that got out of the seafood as broth.
That’s slow food… like 3 hours of cooking on low heat.

The rice is cooked. It didn’t take the color as much as polished rice would.

I added the topping put on high heat to get the bottom crust.

Sweet red pepper to contrast the color.

The seafood is nothing great, a frozen mix (shrimp, clams, calamari) so I’ve stir-fried in olive oil with paprika and turmeric till crispy.

Yummm…..


Ryori, a Japanese classic menu… (compilation by cooking techniques)

Quick list of Japanese “classics” to help you navigate on this site. That’s not complete at all. I tried to make it representative. I often make them with a twist, but I tell you in the post.

Short memo about the Japanese meal

-all dishes are brought at the same time, ideally served in individual dishes, one plate per item.
-there is rice + soup + three items. Or more.

The items, called okazu tend to be side-dish sized. On the menu in restaurants, traditional style was to present the okazu by cooking technique.

ONE :

GOHAN, rice
rice cuisine list ***** sushi list

and ONE :

吸い物,SUIMONO
A soup to drink !

DASHI (basic stock tutorial)
vegan dashi tuto
misoshiru (miso soup, in many posts)
shijimi miso soup
clear soup
O-zoni New Year soup
sake kasu Winter white soup

And THREE, FOUR, FIVE… many :

OKAZU LIST

お造り o-tsukuri
Normally, that’s a term for seafood sashimi, raw seafood. I don’t *cook* it of course.

scallop sashimi
calamari sashimi noodles
hamo no aburi (flamed sashimi)
hiya yakko (chilled tofu cubes)
konnyaku faux-sashimi

和え物,aemono
Cold dish with sauce.

shira-ae veggies
goma-ae kogomi (sesame fiddle heads)
snappy beans and shrimps in kimizu-ae (yolk sauce)

蒸し物, mushimono
Steamed.
egg tofu
dobin mushi (steamed soup)
okowa kabocha (steamed pumpkin with rice)
steamed scallop

御浸し, o-hitashi
Blanched.
mustard green o-hitashi
green leaf maki
reishabu (poached meat)

揚げ物 agemono
Fried dishes.

tempura (tutorial)
kakiage (mixed tempura)
karaage fish
agedofu, fried tofu DIY
kaki-furai (fried oysters)

焼き物, yakimono
Grilled dishes.

shioyaki (salt grilled fish)
kabayaki conger eel
yakiniku, beef BBQ
yakitori (chicken skewers)
teriyaki chicken(the “real” thing, recipe)
teriyaki fish
miso yaki chicken
miso yaki fish
dengaku (skewers)

鉄板焼き,teppanyaki
Grilled on the hot plate.
Beef liver teppanyaki
okonomiyaki (compilation)
ika-yaki (calamari)

煮物, nimono
Simmered.

pumpkin kabocha no nitsuke
kakuni (pork)
beef shigure
buri daikon (fish and radish)

炒め物 itamemono
Stir-fried.

champuru (Okinawan scramble)
kinpira

漬物, tsukemono
pickles
wasabi leaf tsukemono
daikon radish leave tsukemono
dashi’t, Obanazawa pickle
pink lotus root tsukemono

酢の物, sunomono
Quick vinegar pickles. Salads with lots of vinegar.

potato sarada
daikon ume sarada
kabocha sarada

Ika à l’armoricaine

Ika is the Japanese for calamari, squid, cuttlefish and that kind of seafood. Today, it’s in a classic French dish.

The sauce has a long story that probably starts in Provence where, in 19th Century, Pierre Fraise, a chef grew up. He went to work in the US. He come back in Paris in 1858 to open his restaurant, the legend says. And he serve this sauce with lobster and named it “à l’américaine ” (American style). That was a day when he had no inspiration for dish names nor for recipes. So he made his mother’s tomato sauce, slightly upgraded. With a lobster. That was copied, became a French classic sauce for lobster, and cheaper seafood, particularli calamari. And calamari being abundant in Bretagne (Brittany), the “calamars à l’américaine ” became a local specialty. What relation with America ? None, At some point, in 20th Century, some restaurants started to write “à l’armoricaine” on the menus, as Armor is a name for local seaside area. And now, you can hear some swear that was an ancestral recipe of Brittany dating back to dinosaurs.
So we got : “calamars à l’armoricaine”. That’s how you create a regional dish, you copy anything you like and you rename !

You followed ? Oh that doesn’t matter. That’s a delicious seafood dish with tomato and cognac sauce. It’s very popular in France.

It’s longly simmered, so the flesh becomes extremely tender.

Served with a star of rice.