Champilège final : genmai ‘shroom risotto

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Let’s make a creamy brown rice risotto. You need a little more time, but at some point, the broth thickens just as much as with white rice.

That’s the last dish made with this basket of assorted mushrooms :
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The series :
Champilège 1 : Paris in salad.
Champilège 2 : shiitake in amuse-gueule
Champilège 3 : awabitake, bunapi, in pie soup
Champilège 4 : maitake, eringi, in quiche

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shiitake,awabitake, bunapi, champignon de Paris, maitake, eringi…

I had a few of each left, plus a few feet :

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Minced the feet, red onion, lots of garlic…

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New crop rice of this year. Tsuyahime, Princess Tsuya.
From Yamagata Prefecture, well the only problem is it’s a bit close to Fukushima. It’s a cultivar close to Koshihikari.
That’s a good risotto rice.

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That’s a Japanese risotto. A fusion if you prefer. I’ve used kombu seaweed to make dashi stock. There is wine. The main seasoning is miso. Salt, pepper, olive oil, and thyme on the top :

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Champilège 1 : Paris in salad, and Japanese mushrooms

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Mushroom of Paris . Mousseron de Paris.

A florilège is a book with a collection of poems. A champilège is a blog with a collection of mushroom dishes. It’s the full season, get ready for the series.

This Paris mushroom was one of the first cultivated from 19th century and it was produced in the underground tunnels of Paris. Besides the name “mousseron” used for the wild version passed into English as “mushroom”. So now that you are more knowledgeable, you can eat some…

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Sliced and sprinkled with lemon-juice (otherwise they turn dark, which is not bad, but not pretty). Add to your Autumn salads. On the first photo, they are topping shredded cabbage, and covered with a vinaigrette sauce.

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Family photo :
Maitake -Bunapi (shimeji)- Awabitake
Shiitake -Eringi

You will see them in the next 3 posts.
These are some of Japan’s mushrooms. All cultivated.
They are called kinoko or ~take. I think both are cute as “ki no ko” sounds like children of trees, and “~take” sounds like mount~ . So baby trees or mini-mountains for insects.
Some other Japanese fungi :
nameko

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kikurage

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shimeji

There is only one wild mushroom, that is very expensive :

matsutake

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Where do you hail from Miss Doria ?

Kinoko Doria. Mushroom Doria.

It’s a hot comforting dish totally adopted by Japan… but where does that come from exactly ? Big mystery !

It seems Miss Doria arrived, without her luggage in the port of Yokohoma, at least 100 years ago.
I never got an explanation from where it comes. What country ? Wikipedia says it’s from mine.
Roughly, their tale :

At the origine, the dish was created in a restaurant in Paris and name from the noble Italian family “Doria”. That was a dish with cucumber, egg, and tomato to represent the flag of Italy…. Then in 1925, it was made in Yokohama, by Swiss chef Saly Weil , with shrimp bechamel…

Logical ? Plausible ? Saly Weil arrived in Japan in 1927, they also say.
There is a little more on that chef on the web.
Saly was a man… I liked the idea of an international woman chef in the 1920’s. Too bad.

I have not found anything about Doria in Europe.

So you were born in Paris, Miss Doria ? Champignons de Paris, mushrooms. Why Paris ? Because they started growing some mousserons wild mushrooms in the caves under Paris. Probably at the time of the supposed Doria invention.

Make a 3 step doria

1. Make rice :
Rice pilaf or refried in sauce… any flavor is OK.

2. White layer
Top with white sauce and cheese. The layer can be… very thick. I am little player. I don’t want to be able to say it’s as thick as my waist and hear people giggle and say : “Oh yeah !”.

3 Gratinage
In the oven, 10 minutes. Serve hooooot ! You can even serve it on a keep-me-hooot brasero.

Kobe being a copycat town of Yokohama, it has a number of Doria Restaurants. All over Japan, it is served in the Yoshoku Restaurants. Yoshoku is old-style “Western for Japanese” food that started from Meiji Era. The Doria shops offer countless variations.

Types of Doria

Common colors of rice sauce : yellow (butter and “saffron”), red (tomato), orange, brown (meat sauce), green…
Common types : plain doria, chicken doria, seafood doria
Optional topping : I have seen some topped by : a hamburger, an egg, a big shrimp, tons of cheese, an omelette, sausages, meat-balls, fried items like croquettes…

Sunny sides.

Well, today’s flavor… it is a Milano-fu Doria (Doria Milanese)… totally un-Milanese, of course.

Mushrooms, onions, garlic, stir-fried brown rice, with lots of tomato paste, nutmeg, turmeric, herbes de Provence. I made 2 layers of rice. In between : raw spinach and Asian napa cabbage.
A thin layer of simple white sauce with a little Hokkaido cheddar. Flakes of aged parmesan (very hard…).

(meal with double serving of rice)

Cal 726 F25.9g C112.5g P28.6g