White forrest of mushrooms (via Gourmande in Osaka)

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White forrest of mushrooms They are not aliens, but mushrooms… with funny names. Yamabushi-take. Mountain monk mushrooms. The Yamabushi mountain monks are old men, they have long hair and beard… well in the legend. Under the kimono. This is a hanabi-take. A firework mushroom. These are called bunapee. The full name is "white buna-shimeji", so they shortened it. Addition : They all grow in a farm. They are totally white. Recently new colors have been created for nearly … Read More

via Gourmande in Osaka

Rice-cooker mushrooms and beef wine stew (via Gourmande in Osaka)

Last year…

Rice-cooker mushrooms and beef wine stew Beef marinated a few hours in red wine, with lemon peel, garlic, laurel, cardamom. Forgot it all day in the rice-cooker (rice porridge mode) with red onion, shiitake mushrooms, konnyaku noodles. Added enoki mushrooms. While I prepared bifun (rice noodles) stri-fried in olive oil, with bok choy and topped with lots of Italian parsley. Bok choy and Italian parsley bifun. Enoki mushrooms. White konnyaku noodles colored by the sauce. Red onion. Cal 5 … Read More

via Gourmande in Osaka

A tray of ingredients to hot pot… (mini sukiyaki dinner) (via Gourmande in Osaka)

Last year…

A tray of ingredients to hot pot… (mini sukiyaki dinner) Evening is fresher… nothing better than a small informal sukiyaki to warm up the night. Here you have carrots, konnyaku noddles, green leeks, fine slices of lean beef, shiitake mushrooms, "fu" (gluten croutons) shaped in balls and flowers, small brown "enokidake mushrooms" (their name is "yamacha" mountain brown) and a sudachi (forrest fragrant small green lemon) that I don't add into the pot but as a final seasoning for the mushrooms. For the … Read More

via Gourmande in Osaka

White forrest of mushrooms

They are not aliens, but mushrooms… with funny names.

Yamabushi-take. Mountain monk mushrooms. The Yamabushi mountain monks are old men, they have long hair and beard… well in the legend.

Under the kimono.

This is a hanabi-take. A firework mushroom.

These are called bunapee. The full name is “white buna-shimeji”, so they shortened it.

Addition :
They all grow in a farm. They are totally white. Recently new colors have been created for nearly all cultivated mushrooms.

I think the hairy one, yamabushi-take can be seen in the woods, in shaded places, on trees, but the shape is less round :
yamabushitake

The “hanabi” is a variation of “champignon noir chinois” (“wood ear” ?) that is sold dried in Asian stores :
kikurage, champignon noir, wood ear
“White wood ear” is commonly added to syrup fruit salads in Taiwan. We find it easily dried, but the fresh ones are original in Japan.

The shimeji can be seen in the wild but it’s brown and larger. It grows on the ground.

Wild mushrooms are rare now in Japan, or there are too many people that went to take them before you arrive. No chance of gathering any.
On the many varieties we can buy, only two have a strong flavor, the shiitake and the matsutake, which is very expensive.

Nameko the sticky/jelly mushroom

Al dente folie. All that in my pasta ?

I was craving for good old thick pasta… To get those that are supposed to boil 14 minutes, I did 2 shops, OK both less than 100 m from home, but well, just for pasta. I usually like the fact shops adapt supply to seasons, for fresh products. For pasta less, they had many on display, but all were “special salad pasta, cooked only in 5 minutes”. Great consensus.

Then, I had lots of shellfish… but that doesn’t make so much to eat in the end.

While the clams were bathing and the pasta starting to boil, I opened the fridge to find :
red wine, basil with its flowers, grapes of green sansho, leftover of nameko mushrooms, chili pepper, new onion, garlic… and not on the photo, organic lemon.

All that added in the right order… That turned out really great.

The melty nameko mushrooms.

Sansho, and it’s sour and bitter taste. Difficult to describe. That scraps the tongue without burning, which is pleasant when it’s hot. I’ll soon tell you more about that plant that is the Japanese species of Sichuan pepper.

All opened up…

Cal 434.6 F6.4g C70.7g P21.5g

Nameko, the funny mushroom and Seoul Summer noodles

Korean soba noodles and Japanese nameko mushrooms.

First, let me present you Miss Nameko. It’s a mushroom with a girl’s name and a fav’ topping for Japanese Summer noodles (served cool). Most of the time, you can buy them already boiled, and most restaurants serve those… and I don’t like them because of an unpleasant bitter aftertaste. That’s only when I could taste fresh ones that I started to like nameko.

A pack of raw nameko :

Raw the nameko is not dry, not wet : it’s sticky. It’s full of glue around.
When you cook them (about 1 minute in boiling water, refreshed in icy water)… the glue takes a jelly texture :

It’s very refreshing to eat.

Seoul noodles… well, Korean soba noodles :

They look like “hair” of a plastic doll when you buy them (raw, non refrigerated or refrigerated). I often buy only the noodles, this time I had stock with them.
I don’t like their stock, too salty, glutamate, faux-sugar (stevia), coloring, what’s not… but it’s convenient. I had no time.
Normally for this dish : make a simple stock (fish, meat or seaweed + garlic and onion), season it “sweet and sour” with sugar/honey and rice vinegar, salt at your taste. Cool it with ice-cubes.
That was beef stock… I have used 1/2 add water, dry garlic, more vinegar, so salt was less dominant.
Pass the nooddles 1 min in boiling water, refresh in icy water.
Garnish with toppings.

As you see, boiled eggs, leaves of daikon radish, nameko, baby okra, daikon radish, a leaf of shiso (perilla). And kimchi.

Cal 506.5 F10.9g C80.6g P30.0g

A tray of ingredients to hot pot… (mini sukiyaki dinner)

Evening is fresher… nothing better than a small informal sukiyaki to warm up the night.

Here you have carrots, konnyaku noddles, green leeks, fine slices of lean beef, shiitake mushrooms, “fu” (gluten croutons) shaped in balls and flowers, small brown “enokidake mushrooms” (their name is “yamacha” mountain brown) and a sudachi (forrest fragrant small green lemon) that I don’t add into the pot but as a final seasoning for the mushrooms.

For the sauce ( equal amounts, I used a cup in total)
-light-salt soy sauce,
– sake,
– mirin,
– fish broth (water + fish powder).
Plus some water. I like it much less salty and less sweet than the Japanese average.

Heat a cast iron sukiyaki pot (mine is huge…I took my mini “cocotte en fonte”). Pass a cube of beef grease if you have…I hadn’t, so a little neutral oil was OK. Grill a little piece of meat, add 1/2 of the sauce, let it bubble, slow down and add progressively 1/2 of ingredients.
Serve with hot rice (a random mix here) and wedges of lemon.
Eat.
Then in the rest of sauce, cook the second part of ingredients… If some sauce is left (I talk of a theory I didn’t test…), you can cook noddles or veggies for the next day.

Cal 559 F11.1g C88.8g P24.5g