Happy Lunar New Year ! With fried “snakes”.


Let’s start the new cycle with a Chinese brunch. Freshly made you tiao donuts and tonyu soy milk.

Yes, it’s a poor pun. LOL.

The you tiao had another name in each place I’ve seen them… or is it my Chinese sound hearing that is so random. This is fried bread. They surely make 2013 calories per snake, per stick. But, hao chi le, yum yum, that’s worth it

My recipe is super basic.

1 cup of bread flour (12% gluten or more, it’s important)
1 ts oil
1/4 ts of instant yeast
1/2 ts of baking powder
3 pinches of salt
water as needed (about 1 cup)

Mix. Let 5 minutes. Knead. Let one hour (till it doubles).
Spread a rectangle, cut strips, turn.

Bring oil to 160 degree, fry them to pale yellow. Keep them in the oven toaster to make next batches. Then fry them again at 190 degree just the time to get a golden color.

Serve hot with tonyu. It’s the best pairing.

Soy milk freshly pressed. Recipe here.

The texture is very elastic and it’s soft bread inside and the crust is crispy donut.

The contrast with creamy milk is great.

Chinatable in my kitchen

China is a whole world as wide as my knowledge of Chinese cuisine is narrow. The dishes are more or less authentic, but everything was good.

SOUP/SALAD :

Soup : Chinese beauty milk

Soup : Summer Chinese fragrant lake

Medusa salada (jellyfish)

Rice salad for a panda

RICE :

Happy rice (chahan fried rice)

Nira chahan

Eight treasure rice bowl

Peanut and carrot congee rice porridge

Genmai okayu, brown rice congee

NOODLES :

Today’s ramen, tan tan tan…

negi ramen (in soup with pork)

Banbanji, hiyamugi and fruit chu-hi. (Chinese chicken’n noodles)

Banbanji chicken noodles and young ginger

yakisoba

TOFU, SEAFOOD :


Shiso oyster omelet

Mabo fair : aubergine and tofu

Sesame sweet and sour tofu

Red and Sorghum with stinky tofu

Asari and douchi hot duet (black bean shellfish sauce)

Chinese crab dinner

recipe of mabo tofu

Mabo Tofu, azuki variation

Spicing up the Chuka standards, mabo tofu

dinner chuka

DIM SUM (dumplings…) :

Red daikon, red mochi.

you tiao donuts and tonyu soy milk.

panda-man (steamed meat bread)

nira mochi

satoimo mochi

gyoza

Gua Bao(steamed bread, quick) classic

Daikon mochi, the lucky white carrot cake

MEAT :

Cumin lamb chop and kujo negi, Chinese style

banbanji (chicken) and green soy

char-siu pork roast

Osmanthus pork (muxurou)

Lackered duck skin (Peking duck style)

Springtime bokchoi ring, oyster sauce stir-fry

“Sichuan huiguorou” styled chicken

SWEETS :

Sesame jewels. The Chinatown treat home-made.

Mango sherbet and litchees

mangomania pudding

A silky Chinese dessert, annin doufu

Chinese lampion apple

plum niangao (New Year sweets)

DRINKS :

yun-yeung cha (love duck tea)

Salty Gourmande, litchee cocktail

bubble tea (macha)

bubble milk (strawberry)

Yuzu puer cha

Watarigani for Chinese New Year. Little crabs, spicy marinade


That’s food to eat with your fingers so you can lick them after…

Watarigani. Japanese small soft-shell crabs. They are often just boiled in a hot pot, but prepared this way they become even more delicious.

The sauce, the seafood and veggies. The sauce is a personal arrangement of the Taiwanese sachajang (sacha sauce).
Today my marinade contained : mini shrimps in salty brine (ami ebi), garlic, onion, ginger, leek whites, negi leek greens, red chili, Okinawan sake, soy sauce and rice vinegar. I minced and mixed 30 minutes before using.

The crabs are coated with starch, then deep fried.

And covered with the marinade. Turned 2 or 2 times, about 10 minutes. They absorb a good amount of the sauce. Then transfer on the cabbage.

Daikon mochi, the lucky white carrot cake

That’s not a dessert of course, but the dim sum classic. Turnip cake, radish cake and I spare you the Chinese names, mostly because I’m unable of typing them. In Japan, it’s called daikon mochi. It’s actually made of daikon radish, even in China. But usually not of mochi (sticky rice), but plain rice flour.

So, shred 2 cups of daikon radish. Add 1/2 cup of water, cook a little till daikon gets a little tender.

Add rice flour. I use 上新粉 (joshinko), a processed Japanese flour. Add as much as you can to make a solid dough, still stick.

Flavoring : I fried onion, garlic and some red chili. Cut negi leek greens. Plus salt, pepper and a pinch of nutmeg.

Steam the mix till it changes of color to slightly yellow and slightly transparent. I put it about 40 min, in the rice-cooker with some water under the bowl.
Then if you’re a perfectionist, you let it chill, then place in the freezer 1/2 hour to harden and you can slice it perfectly when it’s half-frozen.

Yes, I made the casual version, I took the paste still soft with a spoon and stir-fried both sides. Serve with hot chili sauce and sesame oil as a dip. And Chinese tea.

Springtime bokchoi ring, oyster sauce stir-fry

A classic is always the same, never the same. So today’s Chinese stir-fry is poor in meat, reinforced with peas and beans.

Greener. That makes a very filling dish.

Today’s pick.

Soaked wood ear mushrooms.

Green peas, and cooked beans.

Bok choi, sliced in 4. Steamed on the top of the stir-fry.

Served with Chinese rice salad and pickles(see here).

Rice salad for a panda

White and black like a panda. It’s a Chinese style “salad” plus rice.


Shiny details. The goya (bitter squash) is salted and rinsed. The other veggies cooked and “pickled” in rice vinegar : bell peppers and lotus root.

Usually, it’s only the vinegared renkon (lotus root). But I had black rice. So it’s like sushi.

The other dish will be in another post. Soon !

It’s a refreshing and colorful side dish.

I folded my first Char Siu

Char Siu is the Hongkong version of the Chinese pork roast. Japan has a very different one that I’d write Cha-shuu as the only common point is it’s meat.
The HK one is spicy and red. That’s what we have today.

It’s this month’s Daring Cook Challenge (click here to see other’s meals and full recipes)

Our Daring Cooks’ December 2012 hostess is Sara from Belly Rumbles! Sara chose awesome Char Sui Bao as our challenge, where we made the buns, Char Sui, and filling from scratch – delicious!

I also made these panda buns (see next post)

Let’s start the Chinese party ! You really should try it as that requires planning, but you don’t have much to do.

I used beni-koji a Japanese natural red coloring, so it’s not so vivid. I had not all the sauces, “only” one soy sauce, oyster sauce, nam pla, hot chili. And I’ve used mizuame (glucose gel) not the maltose that I don’t wouldn’t be able to find. For the rest I followed the recipe of marinade below.

Voila ! I have marinated it overnight, slow-baked : 1 hour at 120 degree C, then under the broiler to make the lacker with more layers of marinade.

It’s a cut of ham, with some fat. It’s totally tender and juicy and the fragrance of spices float around…

Bring veggies.

Sand bao.

steaming bao
cheating bao (ready in 5 minutes)

Char siu bao ready to be enjoyed…

Recipe from Daring Cook Challenge

Char Sui (Cantonese BBQ Pork)

Ingredients

1 pork fillet/tenderloin (roughly 1-1.5 pounds)
4 large cloves of garlic, crushed
1 teaspoon (3 gm) ginger, grated
1 tablespoon peanut oil
1 ½ tablespoons maltose (you can substitute honey)
1 ½ tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons hoisin sauce
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
1 teaspoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon shaoxing cooking wine
½ teaspoon (2 gm) ground white pepper
pinch of salt
½ teaspoon (2 gm) five spice powder
½ teaspoon sesame oil
½ teaspoon pillar box red food colouring
(1 tablespoon=15 ml, 1 teaspoon=5 ml)

Directions:
Trim the pork loin to remove fat and tendon and slice lengthways so you have two long pieces, then cut in half. By cutting the pork in to smaller pieces to marinate you will end up with more flavoursome char sui. If you want to leave the pork in one piece you can do this as well. Place in container that you will be marinating them in.

Combine all the other ingredients in a bowl and mix well to combine. I placed my maltose in the microwave for a few seconds to make it easier to work with. Maltose is quite a solid hard sticky substance.

Cover pork well with ⅔ of the marinade mixture. Marinate for a minimum of 4 hours, I find it is best left to marinate overnight. Place the reserved ⅓ portion of the marinade covered in the fridge. You will use this as a baste when cooking the pork.

Cooking Method 1 – Oven

This is the first way that I experimented with cooking the char sui.
Pre-heat oven to moderate 180˚C/350°F/gas mark 4.
Cover a baking tray with foil or baking paper. Place on top of this a rack on which to cook the pork.

Place pork on the rack and place in oven.
Bake for approximately 10 minutes, basting and turning.
Turn the heat up to moderately hot 200˚C/400°F/gas mark 6 for the final 20 minutes as this will aid the charring. Cook until cooked through.

Cooking Method 2 – Seared in pan & then into the oven
On reading more I discovered this method, it was meant to give a better charred finish. Not sure that it did give a “better” result, but the pork was a lot more moist.
Pre-heat oven to moderate 180˚C/350°F/gas mark 4.
Cover a baking tray with foil or baking paper. Place on top of this a rack on which to cook the pork.
Place pork in a hot frying pan or wok. Sear it quickly so it is well browned

Remove from pan/wok and place pork on the rack and place in oven.
Bake for approximately 15 minutes, basting and turning until cooked through.

Cooking Method 3 – BBQ

This method I feel gave the best result. If you have access to a BBQ use it. The pork had a better BBQ flavour and was also very moist.
Place marinated pork loin on the grill of your BBQ

Cook on a medium heat, approximately 15 minutes, until cooked through.
Be careful to watch that you don’t burn the pork.