Pineapple biryani

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That’s biryani party at the Daring Cook’s challenge.

Grace, one of our talented non-blogging Daring Kitchen members, was our Daring Cooks’ August hostess who shared with us some of her family’s tried and true Bengali Biryani recipes – all of them delicious and all of them prepared fresh from our own kitchens!

I had a weird one in archives :

fusion biryani

I made 2.

DSC07256-001 seafood biryani (coming soon)

And this veggie biryani with a fruity touch :

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Pineapple biryani. I took the recipe at the end as a guideline…I drifted away a little to adapt to my products.

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Pineapple is the accent.

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Pearl sweet corn.

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Okra and red bell pepper. I used these season veggies for the gravy. I replace the coriander by mitsuba leaves.

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The gravy, with home-made ghee.
Besides I prepared a ghee flavored rice with turmeric, cashew nuts and pineapple dices.
I had no basmati or other biryani specific rice. The only long grain rice I could get is Thai jasmine rice. I cooked it in the rice-cooker.

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Layer rice and gravy, close the lid and reheat slowly.

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First side dish : chick pea raita. I mixed boiled chick peas, coconut yogurt, very little grated garlic, salt, lemon juice and stalks of mitsuba. Let a few hours in the fridge.

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Aubergine chutney as a second side.

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Basic recipe from the challenge :

Vegetable Biryani:

Servings: 6

Ingredients

4 tablespoons (60 ml) (2 oz) (60 ml) ghee
½ teaspoon cumin seeds
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
½ inch (2½ cm) ginger, peeled and finely chopped
1 onion, finely chopped
4 tablespoons (60 ml) (2/3 oz) (20 gm) desiccated coconut
1 teaspoon garam masala
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon cumin
½ teaspoon chilli powder
½ teaspoon turmeric
Salt
14 oz (400 gm) canned tomatoes
9 oz (250 gm) frozen sweetcorn, thawed
5 oz (150 gm) paneer, cut into ½ inch (1 cm) pieces
2 tablespoons fresh coriander, chopped
2 tablespoons (30 ml) lemon juice
1 tablespoon fresh mint, chopped

Rice:
6 tablespoons (90 ml) (3 oz) (90 ml) ghee
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
4 whole cloves
4 whole black peppercorns
1 small cinnamon stick
2 bay leaves
1 cardamom pod
1 onion, thinly sliced
1 cup (240 ml) (6½ oz) (185 gm) basmati rice, soaked for 30 minutes and drained
1 teaspoon garam masala
1 teaspoon cumin
Salt
1 cup (250 ml) (6-1/3 oz) (180 gm) raisins
½ cup (120 ml) (85 gm) (3 oz) blanched almonds, halved
½ cup (120 ml) (85 gm) (3 oz) cashews, halved
2 cups (500 ml) water
Directions:

1. Melt the ghee in a large saucepan over medium high heat and fry the cumin seeds until fragrant. Add the garlic, ginger, and onion and fry until golden brown. Stir in the coconut and fry for 2 minutes. Stir in the spices, salt, tomatoes, sweet corn, and paneer. Cook for about 20 minutes or until all the liquid has been absorbed. Stir in the coriander, lemon juice, and mint. Remove from the heat.
2. For the rice, melt the rest of the ghee in another large saucepan and fry the whole spices until fragrant. Add the onion and fry until golden brown. Mix in the rice and fry for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Stir in the spices, salt, raisins, nuts, and water and bring to a boil. Cover and cook over low heat for 10 minutes or until the rice is dry.
3. Layer the rice and vegetables in thin layers in a large saucepan, starting and ending with a layer of rice. Cover and cook over low heat for 5 minutes.

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Pumpkin potato samosas

Let’s make those crispy and spicy triangle parcels with a season flavor.

It’s a combination of potato and kabocha pumpkin purees. The flavor comes from fried spices (mustard, cardamom, ajowan…), onion, and kabocha rind. All that is mixed.

Triangle ? I don’t have the technique to fold them, and I didn’t want to stop in the middle to research that. Next time…

Squares are easier.

Fried ! Yes, that’s a bit greasy. I have grated cabbage with them to help digesting that.

Kabocha slices cooked in the pan.

With brown rice and ume plum chutney (here).


A mini shrimp ceviche with green lemon and chili pepper.

So let’s crunch in them… mmmm. Delicious.

November market day

A lunch made with the super bargains at the shotengai (shopping street). Season local produce rule.

And the season is oscillating between Summer and Autumn… It’s a long hesitation this year.
For 1 coin, 100 yen (about 1 euro, 1 US dollar…), you can get :

A whole kabocha pumpkin.
Or :

6 aubergines, to make brinjal chutney (click here).
Or :

3 or 4 yuzu.
Or :

A dozen of fresh sardines.
I got all that, and I have for more than a meal. So let’s go.

It’s easy to make shio-yaki, Japanese style grilled fish. Empty, head off and clean the sardines.
Put them wet on a grill. Sprinkle a little natural sea salt. And grill about 5 minutes (I put them in the oven toaster).

Grilled. Crispy. Very fragrant !

Serve very hot, with yuzu.

Boiled slices of kabocha. With rice and sorghum (leftover from here).

Brinjal chutney

Indian delight…

Brinjal are aubergines. It seems they have many sorts pf eggplants in Indian, many white and green ones too. The purple ones have a toxic substance that will kill you someday… I will die someday, anyway. So I eat that purple skin.

I freely adapted the recipe of the blog Kitchenmantra.
I used the eggplant, red chili, garlic, ginger, tomato, clove, bay leaf, black sugar, salt, and a little shikwasa lime (skin and juice).
And I’ve kept big chunks.

My tempering : rice, mustard, cumin, ajowan.

Served with a wedge of apple. That’s a great sauce/condiment for rice and pumpkin :

Curcuma hot cabbage

Spicy cabbage with Autumn leave reflects…

I had shredded the cabbage in advance for coleslaw… but I’ve let it in the part of the fridge that freezes. So I decided to simmer it, with red wine and grated apple. Then I added lots of turmeric, a little salt and pepper and a hot chili.
Curcuma and cabbage are 2 food that are supposed to boost your body capacity to fight illnesses. So if you pair them, you may live forever ? Anyway, if that doesn’t work, you will have had a divine meal in this lifetime.

And a few nitrate-free artisan sausages (bought).

Served with ume plum chutney.
My chunky ume plum chutney

Sauerkraut balls and veggie confusion

The idea sounded fun, and it seemed my stock of Sauerkraut was never ending… I saw a few recipes, most are fried and made with sausage mix. It’s a little “healthier”.



Onion, fried with ground chicken, spices, the cut Sauerkraut… when it’s cool, mixed in some cream cheese and made balls.

The balls… before being rolled in spiced bread crumbs.

And baked. Perfect…

A platter of sides. That’s beyond fusion. That’s anything in stock… You can see kimchi, chutney, mustard… I didn’t know well what would go. Let’s try.

Nanohana are green blossoms of rape (the plant that gives rapeseed oil, canola, colza…). It’s one of my prefered Spring vegetable. It has a pleasant bitterness.

They have to be boiled briefly.

Soy bean sprouts also need a quick boil.

And sweet corn, yellow paprika can go into that hot bath as well.

What goes well with the ball is…mustard. Not so surprising.

Yum…. really cheesy, but in the good meaning. I like it a lot.