Spahis ? Kaki sfeeha.

DSC01760-001DSC01744-001

Japanese-Lebanese-Gourmande fusion : Lebanese sfiha (sfeeha, small meat pies) with Japanese kaki, and coconut tzatziki.

2013-10-203

Cut thinly lamb meat, season with salt. Cut a little kaki persimmon. Cut onion and kabocha pumpkin in small cubes, garlic thinly, stir-fry with lamb fat. Season with a little salt, cumin, cinnamon, nutgmeg, black pepper. Add the meat and fruit to the onions. Shred a few leaves of mint and some fresh thyme, add them.

Dough : flour, cumin seeds, a little baking powder, a drizzle of olive oil. Mix. Add just enough hot water to form a ball.

DSC01723-001

Take a ball of dough, spread in a circle, put filling in the middle and pinch the squares to form a basket.

DSC01726-001

Paint with olive oil and bake.

DSC01734-001

Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil, chili flakes and mint leaves. Serve hot.

DSC01742-001

Tzatziki : cucumbers and a little goya (bitter squash), the sauce is made with coconut cream, garlic, mint and thyme.

DSC01751-001

The perfect pair.

DSC01753-001

DSC01768-001

Curried chick pea dosa, with coconut gravy

DSC01637-001

An Indian brunch maybe not so Indian… Well, dosa is the pancake from India, but this recipe has traveled via Canada, it seems.

logo

This month is a retro challenge, as we had to pick an older one we had not done yet, so mt choice was September 2009’s Indian Dosas (Vegan Style) :
Recipe here.

2013-10-19

The 3 elements : curried chick peas and veggies, dosa crepes and the coconut sauce.

2013-10-191

The curried chick peas with shishito peppers and kabocha pumpkin.

2013-10-192

The coconut gravy with a shishito pepper and a little bit of habanero pepper.

DSC01626-001

I made the dosas with plain flour. Well, that’s easier and quicker, I prefer rice and lentil dosas :

red dosa
green dosa

DSC01631-001

Side veggies : goya bitter squash and cucumbers.

DSC01634-001

So let’s fill the crepes…

DSC01635-001

… pour the sauce and sprinkle coconut snow.

DSC01663-001

Autumn colors (1) : Pumpkin crust

DSC00475-001DSC00495-001

A pie crust colored by the golds of Autumn. It’s easy, delicious and you can use it for many recipes or pies, tarts, etc.

The season’s star : kabocha pumpkin. You can use other types of pumpkin, some will be more watery so you will need to add less water.

2013-10-041

Kabocha pumpkin crust : 1/3 boiled pumpkin flesh, 1/3 flour, 1/3 whole wheat flour. Plus a little baling powder, salt and enough of the squash cooking water to for a dough.
It’s not very solid when raw, so spread it on a silpat or a plastic film.

That gives the neutral version for both sweet and savory pies, but you can add sugar or salt and spices too.

DSC00469-001

Then I baked them at 160 degrees, about 30 minutes.

DSC00509-001

A dessert version, very lazy. I’ve garnished with coconut cream, walnuts, unsweetened chocolate (100% cocoa mass), cinnamon. The only “sugar” is a minced prune.

DSC00486-001

Momo mitsu-nyu, a plant based tres leches with peach

DSC09625-001DSC09650-001

Freshly invented, this is the Japanese tres leches. Momo, the peach. Mitsu-nyu, 3 milks. It is vegan, gluten free, and oishii !

More about “tres leches” cake and basic recipe.

This is okara, the fiber left after you squeeze out soy milk. I often make cakes with it.

I’ve made a very simple vanilla okara cake, very simple :
1 cup of okara, 2 tbs of potato starch, 2 tbs of cane sugar, 1 tbs of dry coconut, vanilla powder, enough water to get a sticky dough. Baked on low heat in 2 round molds.

2013-09-211

Next day, I’ve soaked the dried cooled cakes.
Syrup : coconut milk + coconut cream + 1 small chunk of kurozako black sugar.
I consider soy creaminess from the okara makes the 3rd milk.

DSC09643-001

That’s the texture you obtain.

2013-09-21

A few hours later, I’ve piled the 2 rounds and garnished.
Cream : coconut cream, powder sugar and green kinako (a grilled soy powder). I’ve completed with slices of peach.

DSC09608-001

A fresh creamy cake that will live long enough to take and photo and then disappear into the paradise of great food memories…

DSC09607-001

DSC09646-001

Scallop biryani

DSC07256-001DSC07234-001

It’s the second biryani for the Daring Cook Challenge.

DSC07190-001

The key ingredient : baby scallop. I got them already steamed.

DSC07209-001

The gravy with sweet spices (wuxi, cinnamon, cardamom, saffron, paprika…), shimeji mushrooms and goji berries.

2013-08-074

Thai jasmine rice soaked in a mix of thick coconut milk and water, then cooked.

2013-08-072

At the layering stage, I’ve added a few edamame beans. More shimeji mushrooms ans saffron threads on top.

DSC07232-001

It’s ready. Toppings : dry coconut, gojis and minced coriander leaves. Goya (bitter squash) to decorate the plate.

DSC07268-001

Fingerlicking yummy… Biryani is eaten with the hand. Well, I do that after taking the photos.

DSC07259-001

The extras standing behind the star, on the first photo. They are greenhouse mikan that just arrive on the markets now.

DSC07240-001

source daring cook
Fish Biryani:

Servings: 4

Ingredients

3 tomatoes, skinned and chopped
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
4 green chillies
4 cloves garlic
1 onion
3 tablespoon (60 ml) (2 oz) (60 gm) ghee
2 cups (500 ml) (370 gm) (13 oz) basmati rice, soaked for 30 minutes and drained
3 cups (750 ml) coconut milk
1 lb (½ kg) white fish fillets, cut into 1 inch (2½ cm) pieces
Salt
Directions:

1. Blend the tomatoes, turmeric, cumin, chillies, garlic, and half of the onion to a smooth paste.
2. Thinly slice the remaining onion and fry it in the ghee over medium high heat until lightly browned. Stir in the rice and fry for 2 minutes. Add the coconut milk and enough water to bring the liquid about 1 inch (2½ cm) above the rice. Cover and simmer for about 5 minutes until the rice is half cooked.
3. Add the paste, fish, and salt. Cover and simmer over low heat for 10 minutes or until the rice is dry.

DSC07262-001

Veggie quickie

DSC06460-001
DSC06526-001

A simple veggie lunch plate, with a refreshing dessert. It’s hot, which is normal for the season, even if the news want to make us believe it’s a surprising phenomenon. I eat in consequences.

DSC06464-001

I’ve started with the mushrooms, cooking them in olive oil with minced garlic and salt. Then added red cabbage.

DSC06456-001

Then mixed in natto, goya (bitter squash), mitsuba leaves and stalks.

DSC06471-001

On top : flakes of chili pepper.

DSC06507-001

I bought these cubes of nata de coco. I really like eating them very cold in Summer. I’ve covered them with home-made coconut yogurt and sprinkled a little nutmeg.

DSC06528-001

DSC06461-001

Sour coconut on coffee jelly

DSC06334-001

DSC06339-001

A refreshing delight with no added sugar. The contrast is interesting, tartness of the coconut sauce, bitterness of coffee.

DSC06290-001

I made a coffee jelly with instant coffee, instant coffee and gelatin (agar agar can also be used). Let chill overnight.

DSC06276-001

I also had home-made coconut yogurt.

DSC06318-001

Crush some jelly.

DSC06324-001

Garnish with yogurt, and coconut flakes.

DSC06349-001