Lunette vanillée, vanilla cream spectacles

Sunglasses are for sunny days. On rainy days, eat rainglasses that will make you see the day in a shiny light…

I adored the lunette (glasses) when I was a kid. The local bakers all made it. Simple and delicious. I’m surprised it’s so rare over the world.

Super creamy. If you like pastéis de nata , pastel de nata, you can only love this too.

In the oven.

It’s simple : take left-over bits of croissant dough. Shape them in a long cord. Make a 8. Fill the holes with vanilla custard cream. Sugar on top. Bake.

Yummy ! I’ll make them again.

In the same family :
flan boulanger

Pause croissant

Second try to make the “classic recipe” of butter croissant. And well… I that’s not the way to go. It’s still too hot to try other types of recipes now. I will try Chef Simon’s recipe with lots of flour in the butter. Be patient…

Croissants for the challenge.

The weather was cool.. er, cooler. Not cool, less hot (26 C). I decided to let them longer time to expand. That did not improve.
It seems this type of yeast loses strength after I roll it.
PLUS : I made a mistake, I forgot the dough 30 minutes on the table. Massive melting… Hence the greasy appearance.

Dissection :

(no comment)

Degustation :

Disappointment. Well, got worst from supermarkets. They’re OK dipped in the coffee.

Well, maybe this is easier to make :
kouign amman

Petit schneck rhum-raisin

In my place we say Schneck or escargot as they look like snails. Others say pain au raisin which means raisin bread, so how do they call raisin bread ?

Croissant dough, vanilla custard cream, rum soaked raisin.

Freshly baked… but they are much better cooled. The dough flaky and crispy…

The cream is soft, the flavor of rum raisin very present.

The challenging croissant

Croissant au beurre et chocolatine.

Not easy…

The Daring Bakers go retro this month! Thanks to one of our very talented non-blogging members, Sarah, the Daring Bakers were challenged to make Croissants using a recipe from the Queen of American TV Cook Shows, none other than Julia Child!

See other the croissants of challengers and the recipe>>> here

Well, that Mrs Child, I don’t get the appeal. There is the video, and it’s totally obvious she pretends cooking as the first thing she does is killing the yeast with a spoon of salt directly into it. ROFLOL.
But the recipe at the base was not her invention. So I followed the “draft” but not the proportions.

Primo :
Warning if you try the Julia recipe. The salt… it is nearly 4g per 100 g of flour. OOOOOch ! It is the double of the old standard amount 2% (2g of salt for 100g of flour). Now 1.5 to 1.8 is more common, as the former was considered too salty for health. This is for bread. For croissant, brioche, sweet breads, you can put less.

Segundo :
The ideal temperature to work a dough with butter like that is 15 degrees C. And that was way hotter when I did it. My flat was at 33 C minimum.

Tertio
The recipe she uses is done to be made with fermented “dry butter” available to pro bakers in France.
Japanese butter is not dry…so I shouldn’t use this recipe.
And it is not fermented, so croissants would be not as tasty but I used yogurt to wet my dough. It’s OK. My local baker makes them with Calpis (a sort of yogurt drink).

Flaky pains au sesame noir (coming soon)

Second try with butter (coming soon)

Viennoiseries (posting progressively)
lunette vanille , petite Tatin viennoise, chausson aux pommes, schneck rhum-raisin.

The recipe… is close to the given recipe. Nuances are the dough is hydrated by yogurt and the butter is supermarket stuff (semi-salted, not fermented… tasteless). I skipped the tasteless oil, put tasteless butter instead. I did 2 rounds, froze, did last rounds, cut quickly. Oh, I was out of confectioner sugar for the icing, I realized when the oven was hot.

So it’s 33~35 degrees, it’s humid. I’ve let the dough overnight in the fridge and I found a huge sponge the next morning. Adieu the well defined layers, that was sure the yeast would eat them…
Pomading the butter took 20 seconds. My triangles of dough doubled of volume in 15 minutes. LOL I put the croissants to raise in the coldest box of the fridge 15 minutes and spongification was already started.

Verdict :
Well, not bad for home-made butter rolls… but bakers won’t lose their jobs so soon. It’s always fun to play little baker.

Eating horns…

Yes, it’s about the horns of croissants…
NOOOO ! I did not bake them. I make or kind of, 99% of what I show here, that’s the 1%. A shopping post…
I bought 3, in 3 shops, to observe them. I’ll tell why later. I had to eat them after the experience.

For those who don’t know, Japan has so many world-class bakers. They are not the cheapest on the planet, but they do really great breads and viennoiseries. That’s relatively recent. Bread was not the local tradition. From Meiji Era, they had mostly Japanese breads (with anko inside, or soft like a mochi…). About 20 yrs ago, foreign style breads became popular.
And many bakers are women, while in France they are a rarity, probably only the “accidents” when the baker’s family had no son and a daughter had to take the shop… Surely before the modern equipment that required strength, and they have not known that here, not received the “male” image of the bread baker.

Au beurre.
It’s perfectly flaky.

Aux amandes… almonds are on top only.

Viennois, old fashion, the ancestor. You’d think it’s bread. It obviously contain less butter, it’s sweeter, like a pain au lait. I like it a lot.

The 3 weight about 50 grammes.