Koyadofu tteokbokki, cooking Korean street’s sticks of fire.

DSC02460-001
DSC02365-001

Today, I’ve made tteokbokki that I call tokkpokki because that’s how I hear it and remember when I have no spell-checker. Yes, that’s hot !

DSC02368-001

Here are the ingredients :
-the ttoek are Korean mochi or blocks of rice paste. For this dish the cylinder shape is common.
-veggies (carrot, onion, garlic)
-sauce
-a protein, here tofu (that could be strings of meat, slices of fishcake or boiled egg)

DSC02377-001

The spicy Korean miso, gochujang. I’ve added paprika powder for more redness, and 2 dried hot chilis for spiciness. That way you can choose the level of hotness you wish.

2013-05-191

Koyadofu is freeze-dried tofu. The hard blocks can be re-hydrated in water in a few minutes.

DSC02374-001

They become like sponges. I had one big block that I cut in slices.

2013-05-19

I add the different ingredients, the sauce, water, then the ttoek and let simmer half an hour. Salt, sugar, hot chili can be added to taste.

DSC02479-001

That’s ready.

DSC02471-001

Sanchu, Korean salad. That’s not what Koreans do but I like it as a side here.

DSC02441-001

A glass of makkoli rice drink.

DSC02398-001

The meal was complete with kimchi, and green jeon pancakes.

For more : Korean Compil’

DSC02432-001

DSC02482-001

Tofu : tout !

Reblog from the “tofu page”

It’s compilation on the tofu topic…I add data regularly.

3 main tofu textures :

You have Japanese tofu that is :
kinu-dofu, silky tofu
momen-dofu, cotton tofu (translated as *firm tofu* in English)
Both are soft and watery. The first is very soft like egg pudding, the second is soft like starch pudding.
Really firm and dry tofu, the one that has a texture closer to meat is popular in China. It’s uncommon in Japan, except ….

Bottom line : If you like firm tofu…

Read more (click here)

Koya-dofu soup. Reviving dry food.


A Winter soup made from a good old style broth, and a selection of dry food from my pantry.

高野豆腐 kouyadoufu
These blocks are hard, a dry moss like the green one you get to pick flowers in it, but in white. It’s tofu. Dried tofu.

koya Source Koyasan HP

Mount Koya, or Koyasan, is the name of a mountain, inhabited by a community of Buddhist monks, near Nara. They had the idea (or they imported it from China) to dry the tofu on freezing days, and it seems they invented the freeze-dry technique.
The dried tofu changes of textures, becomes like a sponge and it can be stored many months. It’s also very light in weight. It’s very convenient to stock tofu, and to take some when you travel.
When rehydrated, it doubles of volume, and I could cut it slices with scissors as contrarily to fresh tofu, it doesn’t crumbles. The taste is a little different too, more milky.

Here the items of my soup. There is also wakame sea weed, not on this photo.

TIPS :
To rehydrate dry food, cover it with lukewarm liquid. If possible, the liquid should not be salted otherwise it slows the process.
To speed it up, in the case of dry plants like fruits, mushrooms, even rice, you can add a little honey or diluted sugar.
To speed it up in case of protein-rich food like this koyadofu or beans, it’s better to have alkaline water. If yours is acidic, you can add baking soda to it.

more info about dry food

Home-made broth. I have well broken the bones so they released their extract and made the broth very white, full of nutrients.
Then it’s very simple :
-put the dry items, and some fresh minced ginger in a pan/bowl. Cover with warmed broth, add a pinch of sugar.
-wait 20 minutes
-cut the tofu. Add salt to taste. Re-heat.

Mmm… a delicious soup full of juicy items.

Five small dishes, J-mood

An easy Japanese meal, quickly prepared. Well, you need rice. I trust the rice cooker.

This block looks like pumice. It’s hard… It’s koya-dofu. The freeze-dry tofu of the monks of Mount Koya near Nara. It’s a religious mountain town that is now to Buddhism was Disneyland is to … er, culture ? Well, a few generation ago, people living there used to follow a strict Shojin that was 99% vegan (exception of a little fish stock) and they invented many vegan dishes.
Re-hydrated, that looks like a sponge with a light milky flavor. I cooked in dashi stock, with shiitake mushrooms and carrots, plus a little soy sauce and mirin, so it absorbed all the flavors.

The dashi was then recycled in soup with a few leaves of shungiku (young chrysanthemum).

This bowl was the leftover of my yuzu-kosho kimizu. So :

Snappy beans and shrimps in kimizu-ae (kimizu sauce dressing).
There are many variations of kimizu-ae for veggies, seafood, etc. If you ask your browser you can see a few : click here.

A kaki (persimmon) for dessert. That looks like a tomato, but no comparison. What the photo doesn’t show is this kaki is super sluggish. For a tomato, that would mean it tastes of water. For a persimmon, on the contrary, it’s usually a sign it’s very sweet and syrupy inside. A real treat !

Tofu and faux tofu

It’s compilation on the tofu topic…

Tofu is soy milk curded with nigari. But some other products not based on soy milk are called tofu because of their texture and appearance.
Tofu ? dofu ? toufu ? doufu ? The only proper spelling is 豆腐. It’s a matter of transcription. The “t” tends to become a “d” in second part of words in Japanese. And in Chinese it’s written “d” and you read “t”. And the “o” is long.

Choosing tofu :

There are huge differences of quality. It can be delicious or absolutely terrible. I wouldn’t want to eat again in this life time all the weirdly packaged tofus I have eaten in Europe and North-America. Maybe I had bad luck. Also in the US, the soy is GMO.

The second thing is you have to buy the right type.
Most Westerners don’t really understand the different types, and I’ve been there too. So maybe this can help. It’s a simplification, but start here :

3 main tofu textures :

You have Japanese tofu that is :
kinu-dofu, silky tofu
momen-dofu, cotton tofu (translated as *firm tofu* in English)
Both are soft and watery. The first is very soft like egg pudding, the second is soft like starch pudding.
Really firm and dry tofu, the one that has a texture closer to meat is popular in China. It’s uncommon in Japan, except in Okinawa, were Japanese and Chinese traditions cross their path. So here it is called 島豆腐 shima tofu, “island tofu“, and in Osaka, I have to buy in “ethnic stores”.
The 3 are made with different recipes.

Bottom line : If you like soft tofu, buy it from a Japanese maker (well, a maker making ingredients for Japanese cuisine as of course it’s not a question of nationality). If you like firm tofu, buy it from a Chinese or an Okinawan maker. Other Asian countries tend to make the firm varieties traditionally.

Gourmande’s home-made tofu :

Basic recipe :
ultra fresh torori tofu (from soy milk and nigari)

zaru-dofu (basket tofu)

Island tofu (very firm tofu)

************
Gourmande’s home-made faux tofu

tamago dofu (egg tofu)

home-made sesame tofu (gomadofu)

yellow tofu or Shan tofu (from chick pea)

edamame tofu (from green soy beans)

Tofu bought in Osaka :

It’s a small sample. I can find many sorts. There are 3 tofu makers just in my street…

kinu-dofu (silky tofu)

momen-dofu (cotton tofu)

Okinawan tofu (super hard)

Yuzu tofu (citrus flavor)

koya-dofu (freeze dry tofu)

fresh yuba (sheets of tofu)

abura-age (usu-age type, fried sheets of tofu)

goma dofu (sesame flavored soy milk tofu)

goma dofu (sesame tofu, not a real tofu)

**************************************
RECIPES WITH TOFU
**************************************

dengaku (tofu skewers)

yudofu (Kyoto boiled tofu, hot pot)

mabo dofu (Sichuan style, several recipes)

age-dofu (fried tofu)

inari sushi (in abura age pockets)

champuru (Okinawan tofu with scramble egg)

chigae (Korean spicy tofu soup)

tofu steaks

u no hana (tofu fibers in tabouleh)

Tofu can also be an ingredient for desserts.

Playing with cucumber…

Deck of cards.


Spiral.


Surrealist staircase.


Vinegared cucumbers (black rice vinegar, onion, salt, peel of green yuzu)


Winter melon, with koya-dofu (freeze-dry tofu) rehydrated in its broth. Thai sweet chili sauce.

Summer’s Winter vegetable… PLUS buta to renkon no shoga-yaki

(about Koya-dofu) Fresh or Dry food ?


Pork filet, steamed with garlic and a little water. Ume chutney.

My chunky ume plum chutney…and beautiful skin nightcap


Mango paprika salad, with green yuzu juice, black pepper and red chili flakes.

Cal 422.8 F10.9g C58.8g P28.5g