Kuromame bean is the new black

黒豆
This is a compilation about ideas to cook kuromame (black soy beans). First, you need to boil them, go to the end of this post for instructions.

SIDE DISH

As a side dish for :
kare raisu (Japanese curry)
Korean wind lunch
Rum vanilla apple black beans, in fragrant tortilla

WITH RICE

Rice and beans.

Black rice
Same recipe as seki-han, red rice (red rice), but with kuromame

Salade de riz Méditerranée

BEAN BALLS

A variation to burger or croquette.


Tama (green lemon big bean ball)

Swedish bean balls
Dark green curry with bean balls

OTHERS :

Marron berry chunky terrine (France)

Feijoada with pig trotter (Brazil)

Enfrijoladas frescas (Mexico)

kuromame shiso empanadas

also in :
Japanese garden creamy Winter soup
four bean gumbo
‘lumaca’ soup

SWEET :

Recooked in a syrup of sugar and grated fresh ginger.

Sweetened with syrup of kurozato (black sugar). They are floating with black sesame on top a bowl of sweet potato okayu

PREPARATION OF DRIED BEANS :

Cooking them is quite long, that can take 3 or 4 hours, after soaking them 24 hours. The time is hard to “predict” as it depends on the size of beans and their age (this year’s crop, or older…).

Process :
-Anyway, rinse them and soak them. You can add baking soda or not (I don’t but Japanese water is not harsh).
-Bring them to boil, you use the soaking water or change. In the first case, color will be more vivid. Boil them at least 10 minutes and take away the foam on surface (the toxic substance of beans).
-Continue on low heat, in a crock pot if you want. Beans are cooked when they are soft.
I cook a batch of 250g without any flavoring, and I freeze most in cups (silicone cupcake molds) for further use.

Tip (that I don’t use) : to keep the color, you can add some nails or other iron objects that are rusted.

Japan’s most common recipe is to cook them with sugar (same weight as the beans) added from the soaking water, or from the low heat simmering… or like I do later. The sweet black beans are one item of the New Year good luck dishes. For savory recipes, you can add a piece of kombu seaweed in the water.

A la recherche du pain perdu. A Frenchy’s take on French toast


Pain perdu means lost bread. It’s about recycling stale bread. It’s poor people’s food. End of the month family meals.

But the world is getting so snob. People go to restaurants to have lost bread.So they eat what when they are at home ?

There are discussion about another overrated American food chain (pleonasm) that opened recently an ambitious (pretentious) breakfast joint in Shinjuku, Tokyo’s business district. The story is they ask 1200 to 1400 yen just for French toasts… that are totally ordinary. Usually, you’d get that for 350 yen. So what’s special ?
And some idiots have paid to go and check that only the price was special. Bravo ! Their reviews are fun to read.

Shokupan, Japanese bread. It’s very industrial stuff. It was on sale, stale. Perfect. A slice = 10 yen.

An egg, a little cream and a little vanilla sugar. Plus 10 yen.

Cooked.

After making this cake, I scrapped the pan of dried ganache with a wooden spoon.

Took out the home-made spicy marmelade and some fresh mikan mandarin oranges (click here).

Let’s enjoy all that with a coffee.
You’d love that for 1400 yen ? I want to open an overrated shop, me too…

Egg head crackers

Simple crackers with a pleasant egg and roast sesame flavor.

That’s the same dough as for egg pasta : egg + flour. I passed it in the pasta machine. Then I put it on an oiled foil, added raw sesame seeds and salt, passed the roll to fix.

Cut with the pizza rolling cutter.

Baked in the oven toaster, till golden.

Note to myself : you should have pushed more with the roll as 1/3 of sesame seeds went away.

They can be served with a chilled kabocha chana dal soup.

Or stored in a box.

Thé de Noël, from the Maison Gourmande DIY

Thé de Noël, Christmas tea is a must in this season. You can buy it, and be very happy of your purchase, surely. But the quality ranges from absolutely abominably artificial to very good and you can’t always try before buying. Then the price is rarely a bargain.

It’s possible to make yours “like the shop” buy pouring essential essences on cheap tea leaves, but for a small quantity buying the essences is not a good deal. So try the old-fashioned way. You can custom it at your tastes.

Grandma’s Christmas Tea :

You need only this : spices, citrus, a piece of bean of vanilla (not on the photo, I went to get it later), tea.
A stick of cinnamon and 1 or 2 cloves, most people have already in their kitchen. The citrus are in season and you need only the rind.

You don’t want top grade famous plantation tea to make fancy spice mix… or I no longer talk to you. A decent CTC black tea is perfect. CTC means crushed leaves, as you can sea on the photo. That’s already much better than the dust you get in 99% of teabags. This one is a pack from the supermarket, a mix of Ceylon and Indian teas. That was written on the package “not very tannic, very mild” and that’s true. Perfect for flavoring.

Be careful to choose fruits without preservatives sprayed on the skin. For me, it’s easier to find natural limes and mandarin oranges than other oranges and lemons.
Grate the zest of the citrus with a peeler. Let them dry one day on paper.

Roughly crash the spices, cut the vanilla and zests in small bits. Just mix in the box, and wait one week (or more) before brewing.

Elegant touch : Small roses that I dried last Summer.

Chaudrée de saumon (salmon and root chowder)

A meal soup with healthy salmon. It’s the season for Hokkaido salmon now.

Lots of bones and skin in the fish. I got the parts left after they cut the squares for sashimi and sushi. It’s very cheap and ideal for this recipe. Boiled that with carrot and satoimo (taro).
For flavor : 1/2 ts of anise seeds.

I don’t want to eat over-boiled fish, so after it changed of color, I scraped the flesh and put back only bones and skin into the soup. I got all that flesh.
Then I’ve let the soup simmer.

The veggies became very tender.

The satoimo became very tender, and gray blue in shade.

After clearing the soup from fish bones, I reheated everything, with some napa cabbage.

The milky color of the soup comes from oats. I milled 2 tbs and added to the soup.
Final tuning : salt, pepper, 1 tbs of Ricard anise liquor. And on the plates a few more anise seeds.
Then mmm… mmm… mmm…