Champilège 3 : Fall fungi pie soup

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Une soupe en croûte.
A fragrant Autumnal broth, trapped under a crispy pie.

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Awabi-take. The name literally means “abalone mushroom”. It’s a type of eringii.

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Bunapi and awabi-take.

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In a white wine chicken broth, with thyme.

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Sealed, and baked.

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Champilège 1 : Paris in salad, and Japanese mushrooms

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Mushroom of Paris . Mousseron de Paris.

A florilège is a book with a collection of poems. A champilège is a blog with a collection of mushroom dishes. It’s the full season, get ready for the series.

This Paris mushroom was one of the first cultivated from 19th century and it was produced in the underground tunnels of Paris. Besides the name “mousseron” used for the wild version passed into English as “mushroom”. So now that you are more knowledgeable, you can eat some…

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Sliced and sprinkled with lemon-juice (otherwise they turn dark, which is not bad, but not pretty). Add to your Autumn salads. On the first photo, they are topping shredded cabbage, and covered with a vinaigrette sauce.

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Family photo :
Maitake -Bunapi (shimeji)- Awabitake
Shiitake -Eringi

You will see them in the next 3 posts.
These are some of Japan’s mushrooms. All cultivated.
They are called kinoko or ~take. I think both are cute as “ki no ko” sounds like children of trees, and “~take” sounds like mount~ . So baby trees or mini-mountains for insects.
Some other Japanese fungi :
nameko

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kikurage

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shimeji

There is only one wild mushroom, that is very expensive :

matsutake

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Yakisoba with eringii and abura-age

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Today, yakisoba, the Japanese version of Chinese fried noodles. Well, that’s my version of it… well, one of them. See others at the end of this post.

Yakisoba is fast-food normally. It’s often sold cheaply on street stalls, at festivals and the teppanyaki (hot plate) shops propose it too. The basic version is made mostly with :

-chuka soba (fresh Chinese noodles that are sold fresh and cooked, they look like thick spaghetti and if you have none, cooked thick spaghetti can be used)
-oil

That’s why we said it’s fried noodles, no mystery. And low amounts of :

-cabbage (cut in big squares)
-additional veggies (cut in thin slices), few and cheap ones (bean sprouts, onion, carrot, some kind of leeks…)
-a little raw meat (thin slices of pork), or cheap seafood, or ham…
-sauce (specific sauce or thickened Worcester sauce or a mix of Worcester + ketchup…), plus additional ketchup or mayo if you want
-pickled ginger, toppings…

My version uses what I have in my fridge, and it’s usually healthier.

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So, I had abura age (fried tofu) as meat.

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A few Eringi mushrooms as meat too.


2013-10-031 I had a leftover of green papaya.

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I first toasted the abura-age (fried tofu pockets), set aside. Then with a little garlic and ginger : onion, eringi mushrooms, green papaya, cabbage and shishito green peppers. To the veggies, I’ve added fresh Chinese noodles (chuka soba), sauce (Bulldog).

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I’ve added the abura-age to the rest. I have about half of veggies, less than one third of noodles. That’s how I like it.

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On top, a little more sauce, shichimi togarashi (7 spice mix) and cut green negi leeks.

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casual

mizuna

healthy

shahan (Chinese)

lettuce

buckwheat soba

Mouth refreshing “pickles”

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They are not really pickles… but how to say ? Small bits siding a dish.

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Eringi tsukemono.

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Spicy tomato agar.

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スダチ sudachi is a small green citrus from the area of Tokushima. It is thought to have lots of medicinal properties to fight diabetes and allergies. And it’s fragrant, fresh, delicious too.

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Eringi mushroom.

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Eringi tsukemono :
I’ve used only the stalks for this recipe. I sliced them thinly, mixed with the juice of a sudachi, its cut peel and a pinch of sea salt. Cover. Let 1 or 2 days in the fridge, mixing twice a day.

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Tomato juice, salt, powdered jalapeno chili and agar. I have not used enough agar for a solid result (you have to follow the proportions on the package). It’s still good and refreshing, but I need a spoon to eat it. Ideally, you want to make cubes that can be grabbed with chopsticks or a fork.

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