Carrot tofu pancakes and ‘caramel salé’ spread

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Soft red pancakes, with a very creamy spread of caramel salé, caramel flavored with salty butter.

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Tant pour tant, equal weight.
(1 : 1 : 1) sugar : cream : salted butter.
Melt the sugar into blond caramel, add in the warmed cream. Remove from stove, add butter.
See what you can do with it here, I mean besides eating it all with a spoon.
You can also continue :

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To the hot tant pour tant caramel, I have mixed in 2 additional volumes of cream. It became very liquid, it has a cream textured when cooled. I have then added a few bits of rock salt.
It can be used like a jam or a spread.

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The pancakes are also tant pour tant, 1:1:1. It’s flour (plus baking powder), tofu, carrot paste (grounds when I juiced kintoki carrots with mandarin oranges).

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Would sting for cake… honey, it’s a beehive torte


Bienenstich (bee sting) or nid d’abeilles (beehive) is a Summer brioche. Serve it very very cold, on a garden table, in the shade of a tree. You’ll see thousands of bees preying on it. Well I have not tried, I don’t want to risk losing even a bit of it to insects…

What’s the deal ?

1+1+1= une tuerie(food to slaughter for).

The honey is hidden in the cream fudge…

… or this looks like honeycomb ? Well, if you had the good taste to make it flat, you could place the almond slices one by one on the top…

Cream is hidden in the brioche… not well hidden. There is more cream than cake.

Rich brioche. I flavored it with honey, pomelo zest and orange blossom water.

Very cold milky vanilla cream.

Kurozato black sugar and mace Armenian cake

An auburn sweet, spice and fudge flavored coffee cake.

The Daring Bakers’ April 2012 challenge, hosted by Jason at Daily Candor, were two Armenian standards: nazook and nutmeg cake. Nazook is a layered yeasted dough pastry with a sweet filling, and nutmeg cake is a fragrant, nutty coffee-style cake.

More about it here.

I followed the recipe given below relatively, well not that faithfully. The 2 biggest changes is I used a mix 50/50 of brown sugar and kurozato (black sugar), and mace instead of nutmeg. From that, I eyeballed the quantities as the textured changed. I used less sugar by taste, and it was still very sweet. The initial recipe would give an extremely sweet cake.

Mace (macis) is the thin red skin around the stone of a nutmeg (noix de muscade). Ground, it is a sweeter variation of grated nutmeg, more fragrant and less soapy. I thought it would be great in this cake. I used the double of indicated amount.

Just baked. It gets better the next day, well cooled, when the flavors have mixed harmoniously.

The base and top appear clearly. I sprinkled a little more mace on top. Delicious with strong coffee !

Armenian Nutmeg Cake

Makes one 9”/23cm cake which yields 12 servings
Video Instructions by me

Ingredients
1 cup (240 ml) milk (I use whole, but nonfat or lowfat should be fine; non-dairy might work just fine, as well)
1 teaspoon (5 ml) (5 gm) baking soda
2 cups (480 ml) (280 gm/10 oz) all-purpose (plain) flour (I suspect pastry flour or another low-gluten flour might even work better to achieve a light, fluffy crumb)
2 teaspoons (10 ml) (10 gm) (⅓ oz) baking powder (I used single-acting, because it’s aluminum-free, and it turned out fantastic)
2 cups (480 ml) (400 gm/14 oz) brown sugar, firmly packed
3/4 cup (1½ sticks) (180 ml) (170 gm/6 oz) butter, preferably unsalted, cubed
1/2 cup (120 ml) (55 gm/2 oz) walnut pieces, may need a little more
1 to 1-1/2 teaspoons (5 to 7 ½ ml) (5 to 8 gm) ground nutmeg (try to grate it fresh yourself; the aroma is enchanting)
1 egg

Directions:

Directions – the Traditional Way (The Fast, Easy Way further down)
1. Preheat your oven to moderate 350°F/175°C/gas mark 4.
2. Mix the baking soda (not baking powder; that’s for the next step) into the milk. Set it aside.
3. Sift together the flour and the baking powder into a large bowl. One sift is fine
4. Add the brown sugar. Go ahead and mix the flour and brown sugar together. Or not.
5. Toss in the cubed butter.

6. Mash the butter with a fork into the dry ingredients (you can also use your fingers if you want). You’ll want to achieve a more-or-less uniform, tan-colored crumbly mixture.

7. Take HALF of this resulting crumbly mixture into your springform (9”/23cm) pan. Press a crust out of it using your fingers and knuckles. It will be easy.

8. Crack an egg into a mixer or bowl.
9. Toss the nutmeg in with the egg.
10. Start mixing slowly with a whisk attachment and then increase to medium speed, or mix with a hand whisk if you’re doing it manually. Once it’s mixed well and frothy (about 1 minute using a standing mixer, or about 2-3 minutes of vigorous beating with a whisk), pour in the milk and baking soda mixture. Continue to mix until uniform.
11. Pour in the rest of the crumbly mixture. Mix that well, with either a paddle attachment, or a spatula. Or continue to use the whisk; it won’t make much of a difference, since the resulting batter is very liquidy.

12. Pour the batter over the base in the springform pan.

13. Gently sprinkle the walnut pieces over the batter.

14. Bake in a preheated moderate oven for about 30-40 minutes. You’ll know it’s done when the top is a golden brown, and an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
15. Allow to cool in the pan, and then release. Enjoy!

An Even Easier Way…if you have a Food Processor

1. Preheat your oven to moderate 350°F/175°C/gas mark 4 .
2. Mix the baking soda (not baking powder) into the milk. Set aside.
3. Put the flour, baking powder, and the brown sugar into your food processor. Pulse until uniformly mixed.
4. Toss in the cubed butter. Pulse until uniformly mixed into tan-colored crumbs.
5. Pour HALF of the crumbs into your springform (9”/23cm) pan. Press out a crust using your fingers and knuckles.
6. Crack the egg into the food processor with the rest of the crumbs still in it.
7. Grate 1 to 1-1/2 teaspoon of nutmeg. Toss that into the food processor, too. Pulse until well-incorporated.
8. Pour in the milk and baking soda mixture. Continue to mix until a slightly lumpy tan batter is formed.
9. Pour the batter over the crust in the springform pan.
10. Gently sprinkle the walnut pieces over the batter.
11. Bake in a preheated moderate oven for 30-40 minutes. It’s ready when the top is golden brown, and when it passes the toothpick test (comes out clean).
12. Cool the cake in the pan, and then dig in. Yum yum!

Oats and orange *florentines*, Grand-Marnier sour cream panna cotta

This month’s Daring Baker Challenge‘s topic is “Panna Cotta & Florentine Cookies”.

Mine is Grand-Marnier sour cream cotta topped with grapefruits, with orange oat florentines, coated in white chocolate.

See their recipes and other’s desserts here.

I am not really sure what a “florentine” or a “florentine cookie” means. I know what we call florentins in France. They are sweets like these :

The base is almond and orange peel. As the almonds and citrus produced or sold in Florence (Firenze) were very famous.
(more about *florentins* soon)

I have kept my florentin recipe and replaced almonds by oats to fit the challenge.

Cane sugar, honey… candied orange peel, oats.

With white or without chocolate coating.

Panna cotta is not my favorite dessert, but if it is flavored and made with good cream (=creme fraiche or sour cream), it can be good. I’ve used 1/3 of raw sour cream and Grand Marnier orange liquor instead of milk.

With grape-fruit. That’s a good balance.

Small plated version :

Other versions of panna cotta :


Vanilla panna cotta with raspberries
Rose petals panna cotta