Shrr…. shrrr… shred veggies

Finely grated raw veggies, and even fruits, are very refreshing. There are grated salads in most places of tropical Asia for a good reason. To enjoy separated or mixed.

Carrot and cucumber are very common. Daikon radish too. I salt it, let a while and pass in cold water to rinse. Nankin, aka Kabocha pumpkin can be eaten raw. I wouldn’t tell you to bite into a chunk like that. That’s hard like stone. But you can add a bit to a salad or make raw pickles. I grated it the day before, and salted it, to tenderize it.

With tortillas. Home-made. Of course, with that shape, I can’t pretend I bought them. With beans (azuki).

And that lemony green sauce (recipe coming soon).

Râpées

The word râpé means grated. Grated, because they cook quicker. If you want a meal ready in a few minutes : grate !

A purple sweet potato, and red Kintoki carrot. Two veggies that are just excellent without any seasoning.

Râpées. Then the carrot is ready in 2 minutes, the potato 5 minutes, in the steam mode of the micro-wave. Then I shaped them in a small mold and reheated with :

Chicken liver pan-fried with onions.

That was great.

A lunch of seven sides, with triple kinpira

Ooops, I forgot to make a main dish for that Japanese lunch. That really doesn’t matter actually. What I love in Asian cuisines is the abundance of small side dishes.
That doesn’t take hours to prepare. I didn’t even need the whole 25 minutes the rice needed to be done in the rice-cooker.
I found 2 ways to make it quicker :
Tip 1 : make some for several meals, store left-overs (fridge, freezer) and rotate
Tip 2 : use the most efficient tool. I used those cheap graters for the daikon, the carrot, the ginger and the lotus root. I used scissor for slicing dry chilis. The set is hanging over my sink, I use, brush and rinse and hang again. Another day, knife may be faster, for small quantities it is not as you need to clean it and the board so many times.
Tip 3 : make variations of one dish. The same frying pan served for carrots, lotus roots, then fish bait.

Today, 3 variations of kinpira. It’s way to prepare vegetables. They are sliced, julienned or at least cut in small bits. Then stir-fry them a few minutes, pass on low heat, add a little water, a little soy sauce, simmer a little.
Average preparation time : 5 minutes.
Variations :

With kintoki ninjin, Kintoki carrot, the red Japanese carrot.

It’s ninjin no kinpira. No fuss. The carrots are sweet and tasty.

With renkon (lotus root).

It’s renkon no kinpira. Sir-fried with sliced dry hot chili.

With seaweeds, it’s hijiki no kinpira. A little sugar was needed in the water. I had made it the other day.
I only added a few drops of fragrant sesame oil, a few sesame seeds.

A white miso soup, with a dry shiitake mushroom and the unused bits of daikon and of spinach (stalks).

Koshihikari genmai, brown rice. I like it a little al dente.

Shirasu (white bait, salted) reheated with ginger, on spinach salad.

A serving of natto (fermented soy beans), with grated daikon radish and a few points of wasabi.

That was a delicious meal.

Cal :471.0 F16.6g C66.1g P25.3g