Veg’ grill


A simple Winter baked dinner.

The potatoes are twice baked. Sliced yaki-tofu (grilled tofu, it’s firmer). Some green sweet pepper.

I’ve added sake kasu on top and painted with olive oil. Then when that was grilled a little layer of salsa.

Poulet de rôtisserie (using a brine)

There are now some rôtisseries all over in Japan and they make the grilled chicken, but this time I’ve made mine.

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Audax of Audax Artifax was our November 2012 Daring Cooks’ challenge‘s host. Audax has brought us into the world of brining and roasting, where we brined meat and vegetables and roasted them afterwards for a delicious meal!

Go to see the site for many detailed recipes.
I’ve also made roasted veggies :
roasted oyaimo (soon)

I’ve used pieces. Whole chickens are not sold commonly here. Well, they exist, but I’d have to go and get one in a department store in city center. And well, that’s a lot for me.

The flavors are olive oil and honey.

One hour in a honey brine, one hour drying then grilling in the oven-toaster… I turned them by hand, regularly.

Et Voilà !

They are grilled and golden on all size, the meat is firm and juicy. Perfect.

Then veggies sides :

Steamed green peas with shiso.

Red skin yellow potatoes for a rustic mash.

Then a little salad.

Grilled tofu lunch

Another little casual lunch. Light, crunchy, colorful, refreshing.

Cotton tofu drained from water. The slices are just patted with olive oil and herbs. Grilled.

I had a leftover of harissa tomato sauce.

A simple oyster sauce stir-fry with lots of sprouts, okra, cabbage, snow peas…

With a small flat bread.
I’ve eaten well.

Mixed grill, mixed lunch, 5 minutes to cook it. The easy fusion life.

Lunch is ready ! And it’s yummy !

The full menu. You need to start 40 minutes before, but that takes 3 minutes. Fill the rice-cooker.

Mixed grill.
Kabocha squash. I only cut chunks (any shape is OK as you can see). Chicken breast, I passed olive oil all over.
Place all that in the oven toaster. Then turn after 15 minutes. After, for me, that just tastes great. I didn’t even add salt. Roasting is a magic flavor enhancer.

Mixed veggies, greens and salad.
Take from the fridge. Kimchi, shiso leaves. A little kimchi everyday brings vitamins, probiotics, fibers and color on the table. Well, I fall in that addiction every Winter.

Mixed rice.
Take from the rice-cooker. Brown rice mixed with sorghum (kaoliang, takakibi). On top, black sesame, powdered. The taste is not very different from rice but it’s more crunchy and the round shape is funny.

I folded my first Char Siu

Char Siu is the Hongkong version of the Chinese pork roast. Japan has a very different one that I’d write Cha-shuu as the only common point is it’s meat.
The HK one is spicy and red. That’s what we have today.

It’s this month’s Daring Cook Challenge (click here to see other’s meals and full recipes)

Our Daring Cooks’ December 2012 hostess is Sara from Belly Rumbles! Sara chose awesome Char Sui Bao as our challenge, where we made the buns, Char Sui, and filling from scratch – delicious!

I also made these panda buns (see next post)

Let’s start the Chinese party ! You really should try it as that requires planning, but you don’t have much to do.

I used beni-koji a Japanese natural red coloring, so it’s not so vivid. I had not all the sauces, “only” one soy sauce, oyster sauce, nam pla, hot chili. And I’ve used mizuame (glucose gel) not the maltose that I don’t wouldn’t be able to find. For the rest I followed the recipe of marinade below.

Voila ! I have marinated it overnight, slow-baked : 1 hour at 120 degree C, then under the broiler to make the lacker with more layers of marinade.

It’s a cut of ham, with some fat. It’s totally tender and juicy and the fragrance of spices float around…

Bring veggies.

Sand bao.

steaming bao
cheating bao (ready in 5 minutes)

Char siu bao ready to be enjoyed…

Recipe from Daring Cook Challenge

Char Sui (Cantonese BBQ Pork)

Ingredients

1 pork fillet/tenderloin (roughly 1-1.5 pounds)
4 large cloves of garlic, crushed
1 teaspoon (3 gm) ginger, grated
1 tablespoon peanut oil
1 ½ tablespoons maltose (you can substitute honey)
1 ½ tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons hoisin sauce
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
1 teaspoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon shaoxing cooking wine
½ teaspoon (2 gm) ground white pepper
pinch of salt
½ teaspoon (2 gm) five spice powder
½ teaspoon sesame oil
½ teaspoon pillar box red food colouring
(1 tablespoon=15 ml, 1 teaspoon=5 ml)

Directions:
Trim the pork loin to remove fat and tendon and slice lengthways so you have two long pieces, then cut in half. By cutting the pork in to smaller pieces to marinate you will end up with more flavoursome char sui. If you want to leave the pork in one piece you can do this as well. Place in container that you will be marinating them in.

Combine all the other ingredients in a bowl and mix well to combine. I placed my maltose in the microwave for a few seconds to make it easier to work with. Maltose is quite a solid hard sticky substance.

Cover pork well with ⅔ of the marinade mixture. Marinate for a minimum of 4 hours, I find it is best left to marinate overnight. Place the reserved ⅓ portion of the marinade covered in the fridge. You will use this as a baste when cooking the pork.

Cooking Method 1 – Oven

This is the first way that I experimented with cooking the char sui.
Pre-heat oven to moderate 180˚C/350°F/gas mark 4.
Cover a baking tray with foil or baking paper. Place on top of this a rack on which to cook the pork.

Place pork on the rack and place in oven.
Bake for approximately 10 minutes, basting and turning.
Turn the heat up to moderately hot 200˚C/400°F/gas mark 6 for the final 20 minutes as this will aid the charring. Cook until cooked through.

Cooking Method 2 – Seared in pan & then into the oven
On reading more I discovered this method, it was meant to give a better charred finish. Not sure that it did give a “better” result, but the pork was a lot more moist.
Pre-heat oven to moderate 180˚C/350°F/gas mark 4.
Cover a baking tray with foil or baking paper. Place on top of this a rack on which to cook the pork.
Place pork in a hot frying pan or wok. Sear it quickly so it is well browned

Remove from pan/wok and place pork on the rack and place in oven.
Bake for approximately 15 minutes, basting and turning until cooked through.

Cooking Method 3 – BBQ

This method I feel gave the best result. If you have access to a BBQ use it. The pork had a better BBQ flavour and was also very moist.
Place marinated pork loin on the grill of your BBQ

Cook on a medium heat, approximately 15 minutes, until cooked through.
Be careful to watch that you don’t burn the pork.

Paprika chicken, coconut cauliflower crème

Smoky taste for this chicken in a red crispy skin. Eaten after a variation of crème de chou-fleur.

My cream was older than I thought, so I used rich coconut milk instead. Other ingredients are cauliflower stalks, Spring cabbage, a few blossoms of cauliflower, 4 colour pepper mix, nutmeg, salt. That’s sweet and tasty.

The fire comes with the chicken grilled in the oven-toaster with olive oil, lots of paprika, salt, herbes de Provence. Behind a few leaves of shiso.

Steamed kabocha.

This bread is made with additions of nuka (rice bran), with sesame seed and goma cream (black sesame butter).