Champilège final : genmai ‘shroom risotto

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Let’s make a creamy brown rice risotto. You need a little more time, but at some point, the broth thickens just as much as with white rice.

That’s the last dish made with this basket of assorted mushrooms :
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The series :
Champilège 1 : Paris in salad.
Champilège 2 : shiitake in amuse-gueule
Champilège 3 : awabitake, bunapi, in pie soup
Champilège 4 : maitake, eringi, in quiche

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shiitake,awabitake, bunapi, champignon de Paris, maitake, eringi…

I had a few of each left, plus a few feet :

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Minced the feet, red onion, lots of garlic…

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New crop rice of this year. Tsuyahime, Princess Tsuya.
From Yamagata Prefecture, well the only problem is it’s a bit close to Fukushima. It’s a cultivar close to Koshihikari.
That’s a good risotto rice.

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That’s a Japanese risotto. A fusion if you prefer. I’ve used kombu seaweed to make dashi stock. There is wine. The main seasoning is miso. Salt, pepper, olive oil, and thyme on the top :

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Autumn lasagne

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Lasagne with season ingredients : kabocha pumpkin, mushrooms, mature sakekasu (sake lees)…
First, I’ve made the pasta with durum semolina.

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Steamed kabocha pumpkin. Silky tofu, crumbled and mixed with a little olive oil, thyme, salt, pepper, chili flakes.

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On the boiled pasta, I’ve layered kabocha, tofu and sauce.

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For the sauce, I’ve pasted the nuts, garlic, sakekasu.

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Added the paste to the soaked fungi. Added a tbs of potato starch to thicken slightly. Let a few minutes on low heat. Seasoned with salt and pepper.

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Top sauce : I’ve pasted sakekasu, miso, water, olive oil, then added broken walnuts.

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A newly created Japanese citrus. キノス kinosu, from 木の酢, which means “vinegar from trees”. It has a very fruity flavor.

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Blanched okra with negi leeks and kinosu juice as a green side.

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Gnocchi x gnocchi

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Gnocchi di patata ? Gnocchi di polenta ?

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That’s the Daring Cook’s challenge of this month : potato gnocchi.

Todd, who is The Daring Kitchen’s AWESOME webmaster and an amazing cook, is our September Daring Cooks’ host! Todd challenged us to make light and fluffy potato Gnocchi and encouraged us to flavor the lil pillows of goodness and go wild with a sauce to top them with!

As I had already made some and I wanted a fresher Summer version, I tried to combine polenta gnocchi and potato gnocchi recipes :

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It’s gluten free. I didn’t add flour. I cooked the polenta, and made mashed potato. I mixed about 60% potato, 40% polenta. Flavored with salt, nutmeg, black pepper, a little olive oil. Let cool a few hours.

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Prepared a sauce (tomato, garlic, olive oil) and stir-fried peppers and onions with garlic and rosemary.

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Formed gnocchi with the chilled dough, coated them in sauce.
They can’t be boiled or they would fall apart (yep, I tried). It’s not a problem, they can reheated in the sauce.

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Actually, I ate the second serving not reheated and the dish is as good hot as cold. It’s great for this hot season.

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Crostata di Marmellata di ‘Ume’

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Well one more pie for the Daring Baker challenge, after well already 3 others. That’s not reasonable. The excuse is I had to use my home-made ume plum and kurozato black sugar jam. The crostata di marmellata is the Italian jam pie, the cousin of the Linzer, so that was the occasion.
And that was delicious… I wanted to keep for better photos the next day, but that has not been possible.

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The dough is sesame powder (a lot), flour, yellow cane sugar, olive oil, a pinch of cinnamon and just enough water. I pre-baked the bottom before garnishing.

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The jam without the stones, a little more sugar and a little flour to thicken it.

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Decorated like a Linzer Torte. I tried.

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With left-over of dough, a cookie size one make with bought cassis (black currant) jam.

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Baked !

So this is not exactly… what I made but here is the true recipe that inspired it.

Crostata di marmellata:

(recipe from Rachael, blog Pizzarossa, from the challenge Daring Baker)

Servings: 8
Active time: 1 hour altogether
Baking time: 30 minutes altogether
Chilling and resting: 2 hours altogether
Cooling time: 3 hours altogether

Ingredients

Filling

Note: You need about 2 cups (500 ml) (680 gm) (24 oz) of jam for the filling. This should make about as much as you need, depending on the juice content of the strawberries, but you can use more or less filling without a problem.

My apologies, I forgot to take step-by-step pictures of the filling but I’m sure you can imagine what some strawberries and sugar look like!

3-1/3 cups (800 ml) 500 gm strawberries, washed, hulled and quartered
250 gm 2:1 gelling sugar (or 500 gm of 1:1 gelling sugar, or as much white sugar (1 to 2 cups) as desired + pectin according to manufacturer’s quantities)
2 tablespoons (45 ml) freshly squeezed lemon juice

Pasta Frolla (basic Italian pie pastry)

2/3 cup (160 ml) (150 gm) (5-1/3 oz) unsalted butter, room temperature
1/3 cup (80 ml) (75 gm) (2-2/3 oz) sugar
1 large egg, room temperature
1 teaspoon (5 ml) vanilla extract
grated zest of 1 medium lemon
1-2/3 cups (400 ml) (225 gm) (8 oz) all-purpose (plain) flour
pinch salt

Glaze

Note: This will make more than you need. Store leftover glaze in a jar in the fridge and reheat before using. It should keep indefinitely.

¼ cup (60 ml) (75 gm) (2-2/3 oz) apricot jam
1-2 teaspoons (5-10 ml) freshly squeezed lemon juice

Directions:

Filling

1. Stir everything together in a heavy-based saucepan and heat slowly over medium-low heat, stirring constantly.

2. When the strawberries have released their juice and the mixture comes to a boil, allow to boil for the time given in the gelling sugar/pectin manufacturer’s directions.

3. Allow mixture to cool to room temperature.

4. Can be made ahead and refrigerated, covered, for up to a week until needed.

Pastry

1. Using a paddle attachment on a stand mixer or an electric hand mixer or whisk, cream the butter and sugar until pale and fluffy, 2 – 5 minutes. The amount of time you cream the butter will affect the final dough – longer means lighter which in turn means a softer, more fragile dough which is less easy to work, but I prefer the texture of the cooked pastry this way because it’s lighter too. If you want to do a more intricate lattice, I’d recommend a shorter creaming time so you have a firmer dough.

2. Add the egg, vanilla and lemon zest, one at a time, mixing thoroughly after each addition.

3. Add the flour and salt and mix until the dough comes together but remains soft, about 1 minute using a stand or electric mixer or a wooden spoon if mixing by hand. Don’t over-mix.

4. Wrap dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes to one hour.

5. When getting ready to bake, rest dough at room temperature for about 30 minutes.

6. Lightly grease a shallow 9″/24cm metal pie dish.

7. On either a piece of parchment or a lightly floured surface, roll 2/3 of the dough (I weighed my dough and 2/3 was about 12oz/340g) out to a circle to generously line the pie dish. I prefer to use parchment with a circle traced on it so I can roll it as quickly as possible, before the dough gets too soft to handle, then use the parchment to transfer it to the dish.

8. Transfer the dough to the pie dish, press in gently and roll the edges to form a good surface for attaching the lattice later. Prick all over the bottom with a fork.

9. Refrigerate the dough-lined pie dish for 30 minutes to reduce shrinkage during baking.

10. Preheat oven to moderate 350°F/180°C/gas mark 4..

11. Line pastry with parchment and fill with dry beans or pie weights. Bake until set, around 15 minutes.

12. Remove the weights and parchment and allow to cool. If using a springform or loose based pie dish, remove the side of the pan.

13. Preheat oven to moderately hot 400°F/200°C/gas mark 6.

14. Roll the remaining dough to fit the pie dish and cut it into roughly half inch/1.5cm-wide strips.

15. Spread the filling over the par-baked crust.

16. Arrange the strips of dough in a lattice over the filling (see links below for some how-to guides – you can do an intricate intertwined lattice or a very simple overlay one like I’ve done), trim as needed and lightly pinch the ends onto the rolled edge of the bottom crust.

17. Place pie dish on a baking sheet and place in center of oven. Bake until lattice is golden, around 20 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare the glaze.

Glaze

1. Heat the jam and water in a small saucepan over medium heat until mixture comes to a boil. Alternatively, you can heat it on medium-high in a bowl in the microwave for about 2 minutes, stirring halfway.

2. Strain through a fine mesh sieve if it’s chunky.

3. While glaze and pie are both still warm, brush over lattice crust.

4. Allow pie to cool completely before serving.

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Italian bean-ball pasta lunch

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That’s the follow-up of the previous post about the bean ball. Add pasta and salad and that makes a delicious Summer lunch.

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Home-made matcha (green tea) pasta.

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Creamy cheezy pesto dressing.
That’s made with the leftover of this :

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The filling of the balls : sakekasu (sake lees), tofu, salt, olive oil. I’ve added more olive oil, lots of basil, a little garlic, a little vinegar and some water.

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That makes a perfect dressing for a mix of baby leaves.

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Meatballs or not…

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So that’s this month’s Daring Cook’s challenge.

The June Daring Cooks’ challenge sure kept us rolling – meatballs, that is! Shelley from C Mom Cook and Ruth from The Crafts of Mommyhood challenged us to try meatballs from around the world and to create our own meatball meal celebrating a culture or cuisine of our own choice.

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Meatballs !

There will be several posts that will appear in the next days on this topic with Japanese chicken meat balls (tsukune) :
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So let’s start with this “Italian” version.

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Yes, no meat in sight… and well bean versions are allowed.

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Taisho kintoki red beans (boiled), garlic, onion, black miso, herbs (oregano and basil), paprika, hot chili and a little potato starch for the binding.

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Chinese black miso is the main flavoring.
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The cheezy filling is sakekasu (sake lees), tofu, olive oil and salt.

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Then they can be steamed in a steamer or in a micro-wave (200 watts). Served in tomato sauce. They are equally good hot and cold.

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DSC03792-001 the whole meal (click here)

Not your usual vodka sauce pasta (veg’, fun and GF revamping)

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Well, I was thinking about finishing old bottles I’ve add since forever in a closet and I thought that was vodka in the dark corner there, so the plan was to do that famous creamy vodka sauce. But, that was tequila. So why not ? I had tokk, the Korean rice cake-pasta-mochi and coconut cream. At the end there is nothing left of the original recipe, but miraculously I got that luscious sauce effect… Finger-licking good !

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That starts with flavors of three fresh herbs in a tomato sauce with onion, garlic and olive oil. Plus a cup of vo.. er, tequila.

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Then pas… er, Korean tokk are added. Then, when they become soft coconut cream.

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The tok’ in sauce.

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A crown of steamed romanesco.

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