Champilège final : genmai ‘shroom risotto

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Let’s make a creamy brown rice risotto. You need a little more time, but at some point, the broth thickens just as much as with white rice.

That’s the last dish made with this basket of assorted mushrooms :
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The series :
Champilège 1 : Paris in salad.
Champilège 2 : shiitake in amuse-gueule
Champilège 3 : awabitake, bunapi, in pie soup
Champilège 4 : maitake, eringi, in quiche

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shiitake,awabitake, bunapi, champignon de Paris, maitake, eringi…

I had a few of each left, plus a few feet :

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Minced the feet, red onion, lots of garlic…

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New crop rice of this year. Tsuyahime, Princess Tsuya.
From Yamagata Prefecture, well the only problem is it’s a bit close to Fukushima. It’s a cultivar close to Koshihikari.
That’s a good risotto rice.

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That’s a Japanese risotto. A fusion if you prefer. I’ve used kombu seaweed to make dashi stock. There is wine. The main seasoning is miso. Salt, pepper, olive oil, and thyme on the top :

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Champilège 3 : Fall fungi pie soup

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Une soupe en croûte.
A fragrant Autumnal broth, trapped under a crispy pie.

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Awabi-take. The name literally means “abalone mushroom”. It’s a type of eringii.

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Bunapi and awabi-take.

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In a white wine chicken broth, with thyme.

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Sealed, and baked.

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Champilège 1 : Paris in salad, and Japanese mushrooms

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Mushroom of Paris . Mousseron de Paris.

A florilège is a book with a collection of poems. A champilège is a blog with a collection of mushroom dishes. It’s the full season, get ready for the series.

This Paris mushroom was one of the first cultivated from 19th century and it was produced in the underground tunnels of Paris. Besides the name “mousseron” used for the wild version passed into English as “mushroom”. So now that you are more knowledgeable, you can eat some…

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Sliced and sprinkled with lemon-juice (otherwise they turn dark, which is not bad, but not pretty). Add to your Autumn salads. On the first photo, they are topping shredded cabbage, and covered with a vinaigrette sauce.

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Family photo :
Maitake -Bunapi (shimeji)- Awabitake
Shiitake -Eringi

You will see them in the next 3 posts.
These are some of Japan’s mushrooms. All cultivated.
They are called kinoko or ~take. I think both are cute as “ki no ko” sounds like children of trees, and “~take” sounds like mount~ . So baby trees or mini-mountains for insects.
Some other Japanese fungi :
nameko

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kikurage

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shimeji

There is only one wild mushroom, that is very expensive :

matsutake

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Mushroom duet creamy sauce for one-bite steaks and soba

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Maybe that’s too classic for this blog : a meal of steak, pasta and sauce. Why not ? It’s based on local produce. This sauce is ideal to serve with pasta, or with meat, or with both.
The fungi are available year round but they evoke Autumn because they have a wet forest smell.

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Shiitake.

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Nameko (sticky mushroom).

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Stir-fried with onion, a little garlic.

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Creamed with coconut cream and milk and 1 tbs of potato starch. Salt. Pepper. You don’t need much as the mushrooms are very flavorful.

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Wagyu Japanese beef steaks, grilled on the plancha.
Medium rare was the less I could do with this thickness.

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With home-made matcha soba noodles, and the sauce.

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Sansai. Japanese mountain vegetables in a meal

Here is the meal that completes the black tofu and agedashi taro in the previous post.

Let’s talk a little about 山菜 sansai mean litterally mountain vegetables. That’s a generic name for many plants wild or cultivated in small amounts that are used in Japan, but also in Korea and China. The hermit Buddhist monks were counting on them to diversify their dishes, and they are often used in the shojin ryori (monk fasting meals) and kaiseki ryori (refined meal before tea ceremony). You can go and gather yours if you live in the countryside. I’m not sure that what I’d pick up near Osaka would be edible particularly with the current level of air pollution. So I usually find mines in the store, and they are cultivated.
There is no complete list of the varieties of sansai. It’s whatever you can eat.  

I had a mix containing nameko (orange mushrooms), enoki (white long mushrooms), warabi (in green, it’s fern sprouts), zenmai (in brown), small takenoko (bamboo sprouts, slices), kikurage (in dark brown, wood ear mushrooms). And I had renkon (lotus root).

They were boiled. So I rinsed and reheated them with dashi (fish broth), a little mirin and soy sauce.

Grilled komochi shishamo fish, with yuzu-kosho citrus pepper condiment.

Pastel salad : cabbage, kabu turnip and vinegar pickled ginger.

And genmai (brown rice). Well, that makes a nice Japanese meal. That’s not so long to prepare as the tofu was made in advance, the rice is done in the cooker, the veggies were pre-cooked.

Jungle penne rigate

A little river of pasta in the middle of the forest. Veggies creates volume to the dish.

Mushrooms.

The greenest leaves of a big cabbage. They say the darker the green, the more nutrients so I don’t discards the best part of the vegetable.

In the bath together.

The sauce is a leftover of stew, with some added favas (broad beans) to complete the meat.

porc aux coings