Savarin battle

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Savarin is the crown cake.

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Well, the crown sponge. LOL.

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Blog-checking lines:Natalia of Gatti Fili e Farina challenges us to make a traditional Savarin, complete with soaking syrup and cream filling! We were to follow the Savarin recipe but were allowed to be creative with the soaking syrup and filling, allowing us to come up with some very delicious cakes!

There will be several posts about it :

DSC01072-001 Stohrer’s old baba

DSC00238-002 baba au chocolat

DSC01124-001 Plaza baba

DSC01151-001 au rhum et creme anglaise

sesame Ali-Baba

DSC01246-001Baba Osaka

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The classic French “savarin” or “brillat-savarin” was made with the help of the famous food writer Brillat-Savarin, and named like him to thank him.
It has this shape in small. The large one is a huge donut, which represents a crown, and the hole is not filled as you would not be able to serve it nicely. The syrup is kirsch (cherry liquor flavor). The chantilly (vanilla whip cream) is a decoration or can be served as a side. Creme anglaise (vanilla custard sauce) is an optional side. When it’s not a savarin, it’s a baba. Well, that doesn’t matter.

On the photo, it’s nearly classic. I had no kirsch so I’ve used crème de framboise (raspberry liquor).

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I compared Natalia’s recipe for the challenge with mine.

So this is the battle of the two savarin doughs :

*New* is the challenge’s recipe. The big difference :
The *classic* is 50 g of egg per 100 g of flour (all purpose or cake flour) and of course, hand made (light kneading). So about 1/2 the amount of egg. It’s replaced with milk. My classic batter was harder.

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I have only individual savarin molds. I’ve used a mini-cannele mold to make “babas bouchons” (cork babas), and a small kouglof mold.
They were baked the same time, which was short due to size.

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From the outside, the new is more regular, nicer, looks more pro.

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Inside that looks similar. The new is dryer. Maybe it’s convenient if you want to soak it the same day.
So the new recipe might seem better in appearance.
For the taste, the difference is big. The new one tastes of egg mostly. The classic tastes more of butter. The syrup covers most of the taste anyway. As I usually eat a few dry, I prefer the classic.

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Challenge’s recipe from Daring Bakers

Savarin

Servings: 8/10

Ingredients
2½ cups (600 ml) (12-1/3 oz) (350 gm) bread flour
2 tablespoons (30 ml) water, lukewarm
6 (320 gm) large eggs at room temperature, separated
½ satchel (1½ teaspoons) (4 gm) instant yeast or 15 gm (½ oz) fresh yeast
4 teaspoons (20 ml) (20 gm) sugar
2/3 stick (1/3 cup) (80 ml) (75 gm) butter at room temperature
1 tablespoon (15 ml) (15 gm) (½ oz) orange and lemon zest (optional)
1 teaspoon (5 ml) (6 gm) salt
¼ cup (60 ml) (2 oz) (55 gm) butter for greasing the work surface, hands, dough scraper & baking pan

Directions:

Sponge
In a small bowl mix 2 tablespoons (30 ml) lukewarm water, 3 tablespoons (1 oz) (25 gm) flour and yeast , cover with cling film and let rise 60 minutes

Dough
1.After 30 minutes put the egg whites in the mixer bowl and start working with the paddle at low speed adding flour until you have a soft dough that sticks to the bowl (about 2 cups or 270 gm) and work until it comes together , cover with cling film and let rest 30 min
2.Add the sponge to the mixer bowl along with a tablespoon of flour and start mixing at low speed (if you wish to add the zests do it now)
3.When it starts pulling away from the sides of the bowl add one yolk and as soon as the yolk is absorbed add one tablespoon of flour
4.Add the second yolk , the sugar and as soon as the yolk is absorbed add one tablespoon of flour
5.Raise the speed a little
6.Add the third yolk and the salt and as soon as the yolk is absorbed add one tablespoon of flour
7.Keep on adding one yolk at the time and the flour saving a tablespoon of flour for later
8.Mix the dough until is elastic and makes threads
9.Add the butter at room temperature and as soon as the butter is adsorbed add the last tablespoon of flour
10.Keep on mixing till the dough passes the window pane test
11.Cover the dough with cling film and let it proof until it has tripled in volume 2 to 3 hours.
12.You can prepare the Pastry cream now if you chose to use it, and refrigerate it
13.While you wait prepare your baking pan buttering it very carefully not leaving too much butter on it
14.Grease your dough scraper, your hands and your work surface and put the dough on it and fold with the Dough Package Fold two or three times around (5 folds twice or three times). Cover with cling foil and let it rest 15 minutes on the counter
15.Turn the dough upside down and with the help of your buttered dough scraper shape your dough http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ta2_h6Qogp0 in a rounded bun
16.Make a hole in the center with your thumb and put it in the prepared pan
17. Cover with cling film and let rise in a warm spot until the dough reaches the top of the pan about 1 hour
18.Pre-heat oven to moderate 340°F/170°C/gas mark 3
19.Bake the Savarin for about 40 minutes until the top is golden brown
20.Meanwhile prepare the Syrup
21.When the Savarin is done take it out of the oven, let it cool and remove carefully out of the pan
22.You have two choices now : you can immerse it in syrup right now or you can let it dry out (so it will lose some of his moisture that will be replaced by the syrup) and soak it later on.
23.To immerse it in syrup it is a good idea to place it in the mold you baked it in (I’m afraid a spring-form one wouldn’t work for this) and keep adding ladles of syrup until you see it along the rim of the pan. Or you can just soak it in a big bowl keeping your ladle on top of it so it doesn’t float. Once the Savarin is really well soaked carefully move it on a cooling rack positioned over a pan to let the excess syrup drip
24.The soaked Savarin gains in flavor the next day
25.Whatever you decide the day you want to serve it glaze it and fill the hole with your filling of choice and decorate it. You can serve the Savarin with some filling on the side
26.Enjoy it !

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Mine (you know me, it’s shorter) :

Gourmande’s baba/savarin
A :
100 g flour (all purpose or cake or a mix. Roughly 9 or 10% protein)
50 g beaten egg
50 g milk
1 tbs honey (liquid or melted in the milk)
1/2 ts yeast in 1/4 cup of milk, 10 minutes before
1 tbs vanilla extract
(more milk)
B :
30 g butter (salted) or add a pinch of salt

Mix the ingredient A in a bowl. Let 15 minutes. Turn slowly with a pair of bamboo chopstick or a wooden spoon to knead the dough, till it gets a bubble gum texture.
Melt the butter without cooking it, combine with the dought, knead a little more. Let covered in a hot place (40 degrees),
When it raises, put in molds, let raise, bake.

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Warm kintoki red bean terrine, with creamy yellow sauce

Today a red veggieful terrine served warm with a creamy sunny sauce that sparkles on the tongue. For a contrast of texture, I ate it with crunchy boiled renkon (lotus root) and a fresh quick tsukemono (grated cabbage, turnip, onion, salt, combined 30 minutes before).
You’ve seen bean terrines before on this blog and you’ll see more because they are very convenient. I can prepare several different ones, bake them together and I have a little stock.

Today’s bean, already boiled of course :

Taisho kintoki mame

This terrine is made of : mashed beans with onion, garlic, miso, paprika and oats for the binding mass.
Inside : whole beans, dices of red and yellow bell pepper, minced onions.

Then, it’s baked and let cool 48 hours before cutting thick slices. They can be reheated in a steamer or the micro-wave.

The sauce is extremely easy to prepare and surpringly refined :
Mix : 1/2 coconut cream, 1/2 coconut milk, a little potato starch, a pinch of curry spice mix (powdered), a good amount of powdered turmeric, 1/4 cup of cut yellow paprika.
Heat 2 minutes in the micro-wave.
Add very strong fine mustard to taste.

Very mushroom, pâté aux shiitakés

That’s a pâté contained in a crust, to be served cold and sliced . This style is more common for meat, but why not for a bean pâté. It contains lots of, you guessed it, big plump fresh shiitake mushrooms.

It really has a strong and delicious mushroom flavor totally different from my previous azuki terrine.

bean terrine

The crust is made with lots of olive oil, flour, turmeric, salt. I pre-baked it.

The mix is 2/3 of cooked azuki beans, a little miso, stir-fried minced onions and shiitake, more onions and shiitake in bigger chunks, walnuts and a little potato starch for binding. Sesame seeds on top.

Baked. It was still soft out of the oven. I’ve let it cool down and rest 24 hours to take it out of the dish. Flavors get deeper and it sets well. Waiting 2 or 3 days would be even better.

Cut and served with crudités.

Carrot and daikon radish in kohaku namasu. This is a dish eaten casually, but due to color symbolism it is also served at Japanese New Year. Everything about it in this box (but click on text) :

Osechi New Year menu

First Frenchy

A compil of French first dishes…

Pâtés et terrines

Pâté means both a meat terrine and a pie. That depends…

patés (meat terrines)
petits pâtés (pies)
coulibiac (fish pie)
mousse de foie aux olives et romarin (liver paste)
terrine de chou-fleur (cauliflower)

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Soupes et potages


Country
soupe au chou (cabbage)
gratinée au bouillon de canard (onion)
soupe à l’oignon rouge
soupe au pistou (pesto)
néo-garbure (beans)
gratinée d’avoine (oat)


City
potage Crécy
potage Choisy
crème de chou fleur (cauliflower)
soupe de champignons (mushrooms)
soupe au cerfeuil (chervil)
cauli-carrot
crème vert amande


Seaside
soupe de poisson
potager de poisson
white bean and clam soup
chaudrée de saumon (salmon chowder)
bouillabaisse

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Tartes, quiches, savory cakes


pounti (herb and prune peasant cake)
cake salé au fromage et aux piments
cakes aux fèves et pesto (broad bean pesto cakes)


quiche lorraine
tarte au potiron
flamiche (with leeks)
tarte à l’oignon


tarte aux epinards
tatin tomate
pichade (tomato)
pissaladiere (onion)

quiche poire et bleu
tarte flambée – flammenkuechen (old style quiche)
tarte flambée à la pomme (apple)


Soufflés
soufflé de potimarron
soufflé de fromage et chou-fleur

salades et crudités

salade de tomates
salade niçoise (the real story)
salade de riz Méditerranée (rice)
taboulé rouge
taboulé au safran


poireau vinaigrette (leeks)
salade de lentilles au saumon d’automne (salmon, lentils)
poire, bleu, noix (pear cheese)
dill lime salade composée

salade aux calamars et pois chiches (chick peas)
salad tahitienne (sashimi)
salade composée (poached egg and croutons)

Or you can simply serve eggs :

oeuf mayo
omelette baveuse
oeufs à la coque

Terrinettes de la gourmande charcutière

Terrine de volailles aux herbes et noix.

Tartine de terrine au foie de volaille.

Today, 2 other mini-terrines. The first photo is a terrine of poultry with herbs and walnuts. The second, an open sand with a terrine of poultry liver.

All the terrines that cooked together… The red orange color is because I sprinkled paprika and turmeric at various stages. You may not know it but the natural color of all the terrines, ham, sausages is grey, sad ash grey and the pros add nitrates to make them be pinkish. I didn’t use nitrates.

It contains ground chicken, pasted liver, liver chunks and tarragon. It’s soft, easy to spread. There were 2 of this type.

Here we have a crunchy one with walnuts. It’s chicken and duck. I added a random mix of herbs from my garden (recently reviving after the heat wave) : mint, another mint, sage, basil, hori basil, lemon balm.

The third one :

October cornucopia terrine

Corne d’abondance d’octobre (October cornucopia)

To celebrate the new month, a nice duck terrine with marrons and walnuts. That made me happy as we don’t get much terrine or pâté here. So that was like a little trip home.

Duck meat marinated in brandy, liver, ground chicken, walnuts and chestnuts. All the bounties of the season.

Making mini-terrines, because they are much easier to cook, eat, etc…

After 3 days flavor starts to maturate. And it’s really delicious.

Mousse de foie aux olives et romarin (via Gourmande in Osaka)

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Mousse de foie aux olives et romarin Take the plain "mousse de foie de volaille" (chicken liver paste), like here : Mousse de foie de volaille , made of liver, butter, bouquet garni, onion, brandy. Add : Fragrant fresh rosmary. And slices of black olives… OK, bits, not slices as you have 2 sorts of olives the unpittables and the not-so-good. Wait 24 hours, so the flavors can blend. That changes everything. For a tartine… or two. … Read More

via Gourmande in Osaka