Autumn colors (1) : Pumpkin crust

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A pie crust colored by the golds of Autumn. It’s easy, delicious and you can use it for many recipes or pies, tarts, etc.

The season’s star : kabocha pumpkin. You can use other types of pumpkin, some will be more watery so you will need to add less water.

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Kabocha pumpkin crust : 1/3 boiled pumpkin flesh, 1/3 flour, 1/3 whole wheat flour. Plus a little baling powder, salt and enough of the squash cooking water to for a dough.
It’s not very solid when raw, so spread it on a silpat or a plastic film.

That gives the neutral version for both sweet and savory pies, but you can add sugar or salt and spices too.

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Then I baked them at 160 degrees, about 30 minutes.

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A dessert version, very lazy. I’ve garnished with coconut cream, walnuts, unsweetened chocolate (100% cocoa mass), cinnamon. The only “sugar” is a minced prune.

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Fresh cherry cream pie (no bake)

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A little cake, made mostly of fruits, ready in a few minutes. It’s simple and natural. No cooking, no added sugar.
And it tastes really decadent.

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The 3 ingredients in equal amounts, pasted into the blender, then shaped in a mold.

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Coconut cream plus grated lemon zest.

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Fresh cherries. Then powdered cinnamon. That’s all.

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Ahem… for a nicer effect, I should have taken away the crust before filling. I broke it apart, but that was still delicious.

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Green duet. Herb and prune pounti, and cucumber lemon balm salad

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A big pounti pie, and 2 small ones…
I made this dish before and there is some explanation of its origins as a French peasant dish :
about the “pounti aux pruneaux”

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I had really lots of herbs around. Can you name them ?

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Starting easy : Spinach.

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Parsley.

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Shiruna, beet greens.

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Karashina (takana), mustard greens. If you follow this blog you’ve seen them (here)

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Tarragon.

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Marjoram.

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A milky cuke salad, flavored with fresh lemon balm. I had big huge cucumbers like in France. The local ones are much smaller usually.

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There are prunes in the pountis. The sweet and savory contrast is excellent.

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Once upon a spoon, 3 little rabbits were transformed into carrot cakes…

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Let’s eat a cute little legend…

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It looks very cake-like the next day. The carrot has become very soft too. But it’s not cooked. The fairies have visited during the night.

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Raw carrot cake :
Grate a carrot. Paste 1/2 cup of sesame seeds with 2 or 3 prunes. Add 1/2 ts cinnamon. 2 tbs of dry coconut. 1/2 lemon juice. Mix. Powder 1/4 cup of sesame seeds and add enough to the mix to get a paste. Form rabbits. Let one night in the fridge.
Frosting :
Whip : 1/3 coconut cream + 2/3 of soy yogurt (homemade). Add vanilla powder, a little lemon juice and sweetener to taste. Let one night into the fridge before spreading.
Moustache :
100 % carrot

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Big moustaches are not as elegant as thinner whiskers but I thought about too late…

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Voila ! The ogress has caught one. Nom nom…
I’d eat a real rabbit too if I could, but these were yummy.

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Little raw pumpkin pies in 3 ingredients

The colors of Autumn in the nature and in the plate. Today, it’s orange, brown and the fire of spices. Here is a raw vegan dessert to re-balance a little my diet as I don’t much raw these days.

The principal ingredients are :

Kabocha pumpkin
Prunes
Raw sesame seeds

Plus spices.

The crust is pasted sesame seeds and pasted prune. I’ve added a little yuzu zest for flavor. I dried the tartelettes at 120 degrees in the oven toaster.

The filling : Raw kabocha flesh and same volume of water in the blender till it becomes a puree. Then I’ve added pasted prune to sweeten, powdered spices (cardamom, black pepper, clove, nutmeg, cinnamon, habanero) and a few spoons of powdered sesame seed.

Fill the crusts and let a few hours. The mix thickens a little.

Delicious served cool or warm.

Swedish mean balls

Oh they’ve done nothing bad. It’s just they are not made of meat so they needed a new name. And they’re served with Japanese greens. That’s still the Nordic and Swedish inspiration for flavors. As you know, I’m a bean maniac, so here is another delicious way to get my daily serving of great plant protein. It’s a vegan menu.

Double bean, onion and negi balls, baked 20 minutes.

I’ve used hanamame giant beans and black soy beans, both are mashed, mixed with minced onion and negi leek white, spice with Chinese miso, a little pasted sesame, thyme, laurel, nutmeg, pepper. For the binding some buckwheat flours. The greens are komatsuna.

A laurel and thyme flavored onion gravy with a little bit of oil and flour to start a small roux, very little, just for the color. I’ve let it simmer while the balls were baked and passed the mixer at the end to smooth it.

The balls and a few beans reheated in the gravy. I’ve added a little veg’ cream.

That’s how they look inside. A nice texture, a bit crunchy around.

The veggies are briefly stir-fried with just a little oil. No seasoning.

I had no cranberries or whatever similar preserve. So I’ve soaked prunes and mikan orange peel in strong hot tea, and after one hour, roughly mashed. That gives a Christmas mood jam, high in citrus flavor but not too sweet.

The veggies, the sauce, the balls, all together… Yummm…