Pattzukis and basil argan oil zucchini

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A 2 dish casual lunch : pattzukis (azuki bean patties) and zucchini.

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Boiled azuki beans are the base.

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I mashed them with a fork, added ajowan, cumin, dochi (Chinese fermented beans), garlic, hot chili, salt, fresh thyme and potato starch. Pan-fried.

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Served them topped with cumin, with grated cabbage as a side, and a dressing :

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Dressing : basil, sesame seeds, a little garlic, salt, argan oil, sudachi lime juice, water.

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Grated a zucchini, patted with sea salt, added cut basil leaves and ground coriander seeds. I’ve let about 1/2 hour.

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Then added argan oil.

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Italian bean-ball pasta lunch

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That’s the follow-up of the previous post about the bean ball. Add pasta and salad and that makes a delicious Summer lunch.

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Home-made matcha (green tea) pasta.

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Creamy cheezy pesto dressing.
That’s made with the leftover of this :

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The filling of the balls : sakekasu (sake lees), tofu, salt, olive oil. I’ve added more olive oil, lots of basil, a little garlic, a little vinegar and some water.

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That makes a perfect dressing for a mix of baby leaves.

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Meatballs or not…

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So that’s this month’s Daring Cook’s challenge.

The June Daring Cooks’ challenge sure kept us rolling – meatballs, that is! Shelley from C Mom Cook and Ruth from The Crafts of Mommyhood challenged us to try meatballs from around the world and to create our own meatball meal celebrating a culture or cuisine of our own choice.

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Meatballs !

There will be several posts that will appear in the next days on this topic with Japanese chicken meat balls (tsukune) :
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So let’s start with this “Italian” version.

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Yes, no meat in sight… and well bean versions are allowed.

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Taisho kintoki red beans (boiled), garlic, onion, black miso, herbs (oregano and basil), paprika, hot chili and a little potato starch for the binding.

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Chinese black miso is the main flavoring.
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The cheezy filling is sakekasu (sake lees), tofu, olive oil and salt.

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Then they can be steamed in a steamer or in a micro-wave (200 watts). Served in tomato sauce. They are equally good hot and cold.

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DSC03792-001 the whole meal (click here)

Kintsuba, work in progress

You have to try certain recipes yourself in order to appreciate the talent of these people in yatai (street stands).
They do that like you cook your potatoes, that seems so easy. In fact, not so much… Also, among many recipes some seem complicated with useless ingredients. In fact, maybe not so useless.

I’ve eaten them. They were good. That’s why I blog about them in spite of the ugly shape. Hey, I’ll do better next time.

That’s what a pro kintsuba looks like :
kintsuba photo from Nakataya kintsuba (online shop)

It’s a juicy block of sweet azuki beans inside a transparent case of thin crepe. Kudos to the makers !

That was the model. I wondered why so many people didn’t retain the idea of full beans for their home-made version.
Now I know ! As I made that :


These are my nicest ones. LOL.

I’ve used that plastic package as a mold. That was not the brightest idea.

As they were not very regular.

I’ll look for another recipe of batter.
Then cooking them…ahem.

I’ve produced real monsters. But I’ve also got 2 that just fell into pieces.

Well, come again some time, I’ll try to improve the recipe and technique.

Warm kintoki red bean terrine, with creamy yellow sauce

Today a red veggieful terrine served warm with a creamy sunny sauce that sparkles on the tongue. For a contrast of texture, I ate it with crunchy boiled renkon (lotus root) and a fresh quick tsukemono (grated cabbage, turnip, onion, salt, combined 30 minutes before).
You’ve seen bean terrines before on this blog and you’ll see more because they are very convenient. I can prepare several different ones, bake them together and I have a little stock.

Today’s bean, already boiled of course :

Taisho kintoki mame

This terrine is made of : mashed beans with onion, garlic, miso, paprika and oats for the binding mass.
Inside : whole beans, dices of red and yellow bell pepper, minced onions.

Then, it’s baked and let cool 48 hours before cutting thick slices. They can be reheated in a steamer or the micro-wave.

The sauce is extremely easy to prepare and surpringly refined :
Mix : 1/2 coconut cream, 1/2 coconut milk, a little potato starch, a pinch of curry spice mix (powdered), a good amount of powdered turmeric, 1/4 cup of cut yellow paprika.
Heat 2 minutes in the micro-wave.
Add very strong fine mustard to taste.