Grilled fish, simply

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An old fashion Japanese dinner.

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Steamed daikon radish greens, with a little chrysanthemum.

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That’s konnyaku flavored with aonori seaweed. It’s from the farmer market, it looks less processed than the one from the supermarket.

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The sauce is very easy : sake kasu (sake lees) and umeboshi flesh, plus a little broth. The umeboshi is very salty, the sake kasu not at all, the mix is well balanced.

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Grilled salted hokke fish.

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Genmai brown rice.

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Miso soup with lots of tofu.

Asian breakfast : salmon okayu

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Second morning of okayu rice porridge with the leftover cooke for the umeboshi okayu

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The base is the same : brown rice + cooked aka endomame red peas + a little salt.

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Grilled salted salmon.

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With the salmon, I’ve toasted a few abura age (fried tofu). To make croutons for a Fall salad, with figs :

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The fish on top of the rice, with sesame seeds and shikwasa lime.

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It’s hokke

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A Japanese dish. Multiple dishes, but simple and ready in a few minutes.

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Sashimi konnyaku. Slice seaweed flavored konnyaku, to be served chilled, like sashimi fish. Here with sweet chili sauce.

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Genmai (brown rice) with sesame.

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Hokke (arabesque greenling) that was salted. I simply grilled it under the broiler.
About hokke.

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A water soup. As the rest was already very salty, there is just hot water, wakame seaweeds, carrot and nira (garlic chives).

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Cassoulet de la mer. Fish and beans.


Diet today ! This is the “fasting day” cassoulet. Oh, I can explain :
Cassoulet du vendredi

The dose of tomato was generous.

After a long while, these white beans get soft…

3 types of fish. Raw cod fish. Slightly salted salmon…

… and shishamo (Hokkaido eperlan) that are also salted and with eggs inside.

The fish and beans layered in the big cassoule (cassoulet pot)

Hot from the oven…

Empanada gallega de hokke con pasas

Abracadabra ! We’re in Spain, in Galicia and you can see the yellow sun in a blue sky. Es la empanada… Que rica !

Schluuuurrrp…. Really, that was a treat !

Patri of the blog, Asi Son Los Cosas, was our September 2012 Daring Bakers’ hostess and she decided to tempt us with one of her family’s favorite recipes for Empanadas! We were given two dough recipes to choose from and encouraged to fill our Empanadas as creatively as we wished!

So I’ve made this fish one and a dessert empanada (coming soon)


I’ve followed the recipe… mostly.

A few minor ingredient veriations. Mostly, I’ve used hokke (arabesque greenling) a Japanese fish instead of cod.

We get the fish lightly salted, for short term preservation. (more about it here)

Don’t forget to decorate it…

And to open a chimney. I’ve not used egg, but brushed with olive oil.

Fresh from the oven !

Empanada Gallega de bacalao con pasas
(my grandma’s empanada recipe with salted cod and raisins filling)

Source

Servings: 10 – (makes a 40cmx30cm square empanada or about a 35cm diameter round empanada).
The filling may sound a bit strange at first, but that’s until you taste it  If you like salted cod, I’m pretty sure you will like it like this.
Dough Ingredients:

5-1/3 cups (1280 ml) (750 gm) bread flour
2 cups (480 ml) of lukewarm water (about 85°F/30ºC), approximately
1 satchel (1 tablespoon) (15 gm) dry yeast or (1 oz) (30 gm) fresh yeast
2 teaspoons (10 ml) (11 gm) salt
4 tablespoons (60 ml) oil (you can use oil from the pan where you have cooked the filling)
1 large egg, for egg wash
Dough Directions:
Measure out all the ingredients.

Shift the flour into a big bowl and make a well in the middle. Rub the yeast in with your fingers.
In a small bowl, mix the water and the salt.
Now, using your fingers or a wooden spoon, start adding the water and mixing it with the flour-yeast mixture. Keep on working with your fingers or spoon until you have added enough water and all the flour has been incorporated and you have a messy ball of dough.
On a clean counter top, knead the dough for approximately 10 minutes
You could do all the above using a stand mixer, in that case mix the ingredients with the paddle attachment until mixed and then switch to a dough hook and knead on low for about 6 minutes.
Clean and oil the big bowl you used for mixing and place the kneaded dough in it. Cover it with a napkin or piece of linen and keep it in a warm, draught-free place for approximately 40 to 50 minutes.
Before rise
Rising
After rise
Once risen, turn the dough back into a floured counter and cut it in half. Cover one half with the napkin to prevent drying.

Spread the other half of the dough using a rolling pin. You can use a piece of wax paper over the counter, it will make it easier to move the dough around. Depending on the shape of your oven pan or cookie sheet, you will make a rectangle or a round.

Now, the thinness of the dough will depend on your choice of filling and how much bread you like in every bite. For your first time, make it about 3mm thin (about 1/10th of an inch) and then adjust from that in the next ones you make.
Filling Ingredients

400 gm (14 oz) chopped onion (approximately 1 big onion or 2 medium-sized ones)
2 garlic cloves
¾ cup (180 ml) Olive oil
300 gm (10½ oz) salted cod, washed and cleaned (you put it in fresh water 24 hours before, change the water four times)
100 gm (3½ oz) raisins
100 gm (3½ oz) cured ham or bacon (not smoked)
A few strands of saffron
Filling Directions:
Finely chop the onion and garlic.
Heat the oil in a skillet and add the onion and garlic, fry over medium heat until the onion is transparent (you do not want the onion to brown at all).

When vegetables are cooked, turn off the heat. Add the saffron and the raisins. Cut cod and ham (or bacon) in less than bite sized pieces, and add. Stir everything together.
Add salt as needed (we do this at the end because the amount of salt will depend on how salty your fish remains after the unsalting and how salty your cured ham or bacon is).
Allow to cool for at least half an hour before filling the empanada.
Assembling the empanada:
If you haven’t used wax paper, either lightly flour or line with wax paper your pan or tray.

Cover the base and sides with the dough. Using the rolling pin or a knife, cut the extra dough.
Place the filling, making sure it is cold and that all the base is covered. Using a hot filling will make the bottom layer of the empanada become soggy. Be careful to avoid adding too much oil from the filling, try to make it as “dry” as possible.

Start preheating your oven to moderate 350°F/180ºC/gas mark 4.
Take the other half of the dough and spread it out to the same or less thinness of the base. You can use a piece of wax paper for this too. Take into account that this “top” dough needs to be smaller around than the bottom, as it only needs to cover the filling.
If not using wax paper, move carefully the top to cover the filling. If using wax paper, transfer the dough, turn upside down, cover the filling and gently peel off the wax paper.
Using your fingers, join bottom and top dough, when you have gone all the way around, start pinching top and bottom together with your thumb and index finger and turning them half way in, that way you end up with a rope-like border. As a picture is worth a thousand words, please watch this video to see how it is done: http://youtu.be/CNpB7HkTdDk
When you are finished, make a 1 inch hole in the middle of the top layer. This will help hot air exit the empanada while it’s baking without breaking the cover.

You can use left-over dough to decorate the empanada, using rounds, bows, lines… let your imagination flow and make it pretty!

Using a fork, prick the top layer or, using scissors, make snips that go all the way through the top layer.
In a small bowl, beat an egg and add a tbsp of cold water. With the pastry brush, paint the top of the empanada with the egg wash.
Place the empanada in the oven and bake for about 45 minutes. Check that the bottom part is done.

To-gan, Summer Winter squash


This big green object is a togan, tougan, 冬瓜 literally Winter melon, but the season started a while ago and lasts till Winter. It’s very popular in Hong-Kong to carve one and serve a soup in it.
It’s good for the hot days as it’s very watery, so it’s hydrating. To resist the heat, it is advised to avoid drinking and to eat your water instead, precisely with watery food. 

I cut the flesh. Put in a bowl with water and cook in the microwave. Easy. The taste is… What taste ? There is not much.

I’ve added a few bits of kabocha pumpkin, grated ginger and soy sauce. Let cool. And you have a refreshing Summer veggie.

With stir-fried pasta.

Enoki mushrooms, steamed, cooled, with Chinese black vinegar, miso and negi.

Salted hokke, grilled.

Well another good meal !

Belle jardinière

Jardinière de légumes.
A jardinière is a woman gardener. She gave her name for all mix of season veggies from the garden. Today, they are simply steamed together.

Sanma fish, Pacific saury. I bought it salted. So I grilled it 5 minutes in the oven-toaster. I have not added anything to the vegetables because salty fish is very strong, salty, fat, fishy. Eating them together with a little squizzed lemon gives a nice balance.