A green year of savor’hits

green

A random selections of favorite 2013 savory posts… Most are plant-based, all were yummy ! Thanks for visiting. I hope to see you again in 2014

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Romanesco and cauliflower green quiche

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My experiments in plant based milks and yogurts


Simple nori okaki. Make your own Japanese rice crackers.

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Sesame sweet and sour tofu


Mehari sushi, the leafy snack

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Gifu squash and fondue-pa’


Avocado edamame breakfast croquettes, my simple recipe

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Green gnocchi in yellow curry soup

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Salade de crudités updated : veggie nori-maki

vegan ramen burger
black bean ramen burger

to
The grapes of waves. Okinawa’s green caviar.
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Tarte croustillante au boudin blanc

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Ideal season for a sausage apple pie. Yes, really and that’s a delicious delicate and light dish.
Tarte croustillante au boudin blanc (crispy pie with “white pudding” sausage).

Let’s turn the wheel of 4 apples :
early fuji (早生ふじ- ほのか)
jonagold,
akibae,
toki

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Fallen apple leaves on Autumn pie leaves…

Let’s make a boudin blanc (white pudding sausage).

It’s flavored with :

DSC02008-001 awabitake (abalone mushroom)

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The sausage slices turned into flowers, painted gold (egg yolk).

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Baked.

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Caramelized onion polentart

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A golden version of the pissaladiere, the onion and anchovy tart from Provence.

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I add a second polenta tart crust left from when I baked this tarte polenta.
I’ve painted it with olive oil, baked it.

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Garnished with onions cooked till brown in the olive oil from a can of anchovies with a little garlic. Garnished the crust. Added red chili and a few anchovy filets. Re-baked briefly. Decorated with green olives and thyme. You can make it without anchovies if you add a little soy sauce to the onions.

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Cut when it’s cooled. I eat it at room temperature, and in this season that means warm.

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New ginger carrot okara cookies

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I made these savory cookies to use leftovers. They ended up like heath store cookies, full of fibers and good nutrients.

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Carrot lees, what is left from juicing.

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Okara, the leftover from making tofu and soy milk.

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New ginger, still pink like a little baby. It’s available in Summer. Ginger pickles are made with it.

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Carrot + okara + minced ginger. I’ve added miso and powdered sesame for flavor, potato starch for binding.

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Spread on cooking paper, with more sesame seeds.

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After baking, they are still soft. The next day, they hardened and flavors have combined.

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Simple nori okaki. Make your own Japanese rice crackers.

They are called okaki or sembei, and there are other names. Japanese rice crackers have been widely exported and they now have fans all over the world. It’s possible to make yours.

DRY MOCHI

You need dried mochi for this recipe. I guess it’s not so easy to find outside Japan If you can’t get them, just mochi rice blocks like this :

all about mochi

You can probably find some in most Asian stores.

Cut thin slices of mochi and let them dry in a room not too hot (it’s easy to find when you don’t heat your place in this season…). If you don’t see the difference :

Some are broken, they really look dryer. That took 3 days. That depends on weather. There are people that hang them outside, like these :

noshi mochi(click here)

The advantage is the dried mochi can be kept a long time, they don’t get molds on them. Then when you want to eat them, you can grill or fry them.

OKAKI or SEMBEI (rice crackers) :

Click here for grilled okaki

Frying them is an easy, quick and tasty method :

The oil was quite hot (180 degrees Celcius). After one minute, they change of color. Turn them. That takes 2 minutes.

On paper to absorb the excess of oil. That’s all !

Casual presentation : I’ve cut ribbons of nori seaweed and sprinkled salt. But you can stick the nori on the crackers. Another day, we’ll do that. Store them in a metal box. Unless you want to eat them…

You will see what I did with the cubes soon…

Crack… crack… crack…

Daikon mochi, the lucky white carrot cake

That’s not a dessert of course, but the dim sum classic. Turnip cake, radish cake and I spare you the Chinese names, mostly because I’m unable of typing them. In Japan, it’s called daikon mochi. It’s actually made of daikon radish, even in China. But usually not of mochi (sticky rice), but plain rice flour.

So, shred 2 cups of daikon radish. Add 1/2 cup of water, cook a little till daikon gets a little tender.

Add rice flour. I use 上新粉 (joshinko), a processed Japanese flour. Add as much as you can to make a solid dough, still stick.

Flavoring : I fried onion, garlic and some red chili. Cut negi leek greens. Plus salt, pepper and a pinch of nutmeg.

Steam the mix till it changes of color to slightly yellow and slightly transparent. I put it about 40 min, in the rice-cooker with some water under the bowl.
Then if you’re a perfectionist, you let it chill, then place in the freezer 1/2 hour to harden and you can slice it perfectly when it’s half-frozen.

Yes, I made the casual version, I took the paste still soft with a spoon and stir-fried both sides. Serve with hot chili sauce and sesame oil as a dip. And Chinese tea.

Oats and egg

A simple savory brunch, very warm.

Oats simmered with carrots, leeks, onion, salt and pepper.

A heated egg (I’ve sunk it in boiled water just the time I chopped the negi). Then the white keeps cooking while you take the photo. Add negi greens, and enjoy :