Aka endo mame tortilla, and veggie plate

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A nice plant-based brunch to enjoy season local produce.

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Do you remember these aka endo mame red peas ? I soaked them and made this batter :

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Adding hijiki seaweed, grated turmeric, chili pepper and soy sauce.

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Cooked like a pancake. It’s possible to flip it, but it breaks when you fold it.

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That’s it. On top, drizzles of balsamico sauce.

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The red carrots of Kyoto.

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Just grated them. They have a sweeter and fruitier taste than average carrots.

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Leafy daikon radish.

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Just steamed.

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Big daikon. I cut, salted, let 30 minutes and rinsed.

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Yuzu dressing : yuzu citrus juice, grated peel, salt and sesame oil.

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Crunchy, yummy, filling…

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Red daikon, red mochi.

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A colorful version of the Chinese snack that is called in Japan daikon mochi and I can’t pronounce any of its names in Chinese dialects… Well, radish cake.

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I washed and grated my red skin daikon radish. It’s white inside as usual.

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I steamed the daikon. Added an equivalent volume of mochiko (sticky rice flour) with enough water to get it creamy. For flavoring : salt, chili pepper flakes, dry shiitake mushroom, fish flakes (skip for vegan version). And fried slices of garlic.

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I steamed the cakes. Let them chill.

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Then pan-fried cuts of very cold cakes in sesame oil. They become creamy inside, crispy around. The flower is a slice of raw daikon.

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For sauce : sweet chili sauce + Bulldog Worcester style sauce.

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Today’s bibinbap

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Korean lunch : bibinbap, the colorful rice bowl.
Put rice to cook in the cooker and let’s go :

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Namul veggies (preparation here)

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Azuki-natto : I heated onion and cooked azuki beans with a little oil. When the onions were cooked, added a little miso and natto and mashed roughly.

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The soup is soaking water of shiitake mushrooms (those used for the namul), in it, I cooked mini-radish and added cubes of silky tofu.
Also get some kimchi, a egg yolk and fragrant sesame oil.

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Put all the garnishing veggies on very hot rice, add a egg yolk, a drizzle of sesame oil. Serve with the hot soup.

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Add a little broth in the bowl, mix and enjoy :

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Autumn namul

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Namul is the name of Korean style blanched veggies.

The boring supermarket version, all year round the same :
namul set
Boiled spinach, soy bean sprouts, zenmai fern and daikon radish.

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Home-made version, in Spring.
So this time with Autumn produce :

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I had suguna kabocha. I grated and steamed it, added only sesame oil and garlic.

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Soy bean sprouts, steamed, with soy sauce, a little hot chili, garlic, sesame oil.

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Konnyaku. I’ve added re-hydrated shiitake mushrooms. with soy sauce, a little hot chili, garlic, sesame oil. Let overnight.

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Leafy radish. Blanched and refreshed the greens in cold water. Added garlic and sesame oil.

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The 4 dishes :

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Autumn leaf daigaku imo

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大学芋 Daigaku imo, literally “the university’s potato”, is a street stall sweet. It’s certainly of Chinese origin, but theses sticky potatoes have become part of the furniture in Japan. Osaka has a famous shop that makes some special ones, dipped in crack maybe, as you can’t stop if you start eaten one. I don’t know their secret. Maybe there is none. You take good satsuma imo (Japanese sweet potato), you fry them and coat in a syrup.
And the results depends on the quality of your ingredients and how you master the process.

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Flat and small is easier, so I cut shapes of 5 mm of thickness.

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I cook them in 3 steps : steaming till they are half-cooked, then I stir-fry them at 160 degrees C till they soften. I put them aside and bring the oil at 180 degrees, to cook them a little more and get crispiness. I put on oil absorbing paper 2 minutes.

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Syrup : 1 tbs of sugar + 1 tbs of honey or mizuame (glucose jelly) + 2 tbs of water. Simmer till it starts getting thicker. Add a few drops of fragrant sesame oil. Pass the freshly fried potatoes (still hot) in this hot syrup.
Decorate with black sesame.

NB : I fry them in normal neutral frying oil, not the dark sesame oil for seasoning. It’s possible to fry in sesame oil but only if you have a different white frying sesame oil.

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They have to be soft inside crispy around. They are better if you eat them warm, just after making them.

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Sara udon lunch

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Sara udon with 3 greens.

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空芯菜 kushinsai, water morning glory. It’s a South East Asia classic green. With the tropical weather we have now, they can grow it easily.

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Green pea sprouts.

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Kujo is the 9th Avenue, in Kyoto. They don’t grow them in the street now, but maybe 200 years ago. It’s one of the many Kyoto area original vegetables.

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I’ve stir-fried ginger, onion, garlic, kujo negi whites and kabocha pumpkin. Then added ankake sauce. I’ve added the 2 greens at the end. That’s my sauce to pour on :

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Sara udon.

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First side : cabbage and cherry tomato salad, with sesame oil dressing.

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Second side : silky tofu, to eat with soy sauce and minced greens of kujo negi.

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Reba-sashi, but fake. What could replace the Japanese carpaccio…

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レバ刺し reba sashi (liver sashimi). It’s an immensely popular food in Japan. A few years ago all the yakiniku, yakitori and izakaya restaurants proposed it. I find it delicious too.
BUT…
I guess you are wondering if it’s healthy to eat raw liver. The answer is unfortunately that it’s risky and a number of food poisoning cases have occurred, so now the delicacy has disappeared from menus. And people miss it. So food industry made “safe liver sashimi”. It’s planted based, maybe not fully vegan (I’m not sure about all coloring ingredient) but at 99%. It’s made of konnyaku.

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That’s how it is in the package. The faux-liver is in a liquid, you just need to rinse it. There is a sauce to marinate or to dip and sesame seeds. Sold less than 200 yen, that’s expensive for konnyaku but cheaper that the original liver.

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Perfect appearance. Taste ? None. You will only have the taste of the sauce. Let’s try.

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Served with mitsuba and onions (salted, rinsed).

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A dip in the sauce.

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Catching toasted sesame seeds and chili flakes that I’ve added.

VERDICT : YES… but NO.
Yes for the idea. As I said, you don’t have the liver flavor, it’s lost. but the texture and freshness is pleasant and goes well with the oily dressing. That could be good… with another sauce.
No, because I don’t like their sauce, this brand’s sauce. It’s too dominated by soy sauce and onion, too salty.

The classic sauce is usually simpler : a good ra yu (flavored sesame oil, infused with garlic and chili) and very little soy sauce.

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I made my version with argan oil, natural sea salt, a few drops of soy sauce, dry garlic chips, dry chili flakes. Mix, and after 15 minutes, place the faux-liver in it 5 minutes. The great taste of the oil is showcased.
You have a nice appetizer.

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