Soba no mi, buckwheat as rice

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Buckwheat groats (sometimes called buckwheat berries) are called 蕎麦の実 soba no mi in Japanese. Mi means fruit/nut, and maybe that’s not too far from the botanical reality as that’s not really a grain. They are often added to cook together with rice. And they can simply replace rice.

Raw.

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Cooked in the rice cooker on brown rice program.

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I’ve added a few drops of sesame oil and black sesame for even more nutty flavor. No salt because I add it with :

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Umeboshi natto.

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Satsuma imo (sweet potato) and mizu nasu.

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Platter of steamed veggies : suguna kabocha, satsuma imo, bok choi and chestnuts.

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Not a pretty dish… This type of aubergine mizu nasu is usually served raw. I’ve sliced (I did) and cut in ribbons (roughly) the flesh. Salted. Rinsed after 19 minutes and sprinkles shikwasa lime juice.

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A nice old fashioned meal.

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Ika to ikashiokara no nimono (calamari with calamari)

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The photos don’t always reveal the truth about the taste but that was particularly delicious today. That’s a simmered seafood dish a little unusual. I have used calamari in two states, fresh and as shiokarai.
Well how can I explain all the poetry of shiokarai seafood on a blog ? You should see it, smell it, try it. It has a very strong fermented iodine flavor. I am not sure most people would like it.

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イカの塩辛ika no shiokarai is the complete name, often shortenened in ikashiokara‎ too. “shiokarai” calamari. Shiokarai means salty, very salty, too salty. So it’s raw calamari, salted and fermented in its brine with its ink. Here is an example of how it is made (click). I buy it if possible, because I tend to fail when I make it… and it’s cheap and sold everywhere in Osaka. Someday we’ll even have vending machines.
The only problem of this food is it’s extremely salty, so you eat it in very small amount, a teaspoon maximum on the side of your meal or on your bowl of rice. That’s why I wanted to add more volume to it.

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A fresh calamar that has released its ink. No problem, I didn’t need it. I simply cleaned and cut it.

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First, I cooked in a little oil, onion, garlic, ginger, the calamari. Then I’ve added 1 tbs of ikashiokara and 2 glasses of white wine (rather sweet, otherwise a little sugar would be welcome).Let simmer and reduce. Added more fresh ginger after 30 minutes.

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It’s ready when the calamari is tender (that takes about 40 minutes). The red color comes naturally.

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Small aubergines, steamed then grilled. No seasoning is needed because they are excellent just grilled and the dish is still very salty.

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A side of kuri gohan (chestnut rice).

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Kikuna chrysanthemum greens and shikwasa island lime to refresh the plate.

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Romanesco ganmodoki

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がんもどきGanmodoki are one of the numerous tofu based specialties that you can find in Japan. You wonder how many there are ? Oh, hundreds :

The Tofu Hyakuchin (豆腐百珍 Tōfu Hyakuchin?) is a Japanese recipe book written by Ka Hitsujun (何必醇) and published in 1782 during the Edo period. It lists 100 recipes for preparing tofu. Due to its immense popularity at the time, a second volume was published the following year.

source

And they had no romanesco then, so recipes like this were added later.
We can buy different types of ganmodoki in tofu shops, at markets and supermarkets and use them in many dishes. Making yours is easy.
Romanesco is beautiful. I’m never tired of watching it.

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For the detailed recipe, see on the blog of the Gourmet that lives in Shizuoka. I simply changed the garnishing vegetables.

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The stalks and leaves of the romanesco. I eat them too in soups or whatever. Here, I’ve cut thin sticks and steamed them. I’ve also steamed a few kabocha pumpkin sticks.

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ヒジキHijiki seaweed. We can buy them fresh or dry. That doesn’t make a big difference. Add water to the dry ones, wait 10 minutes.

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I pan-fried them.

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Served with steamed romanesco, raw myoga, and shikwasa lime juice as a seasoning.

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A nice plant based lunch.

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Fig tartelette, with peanut crust and shikwasa cream

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A quick nutty and fruity dessert, very healthy. There is no added sugar, it’s pure fruit flavor. The crust is pleasantly soft with crunchy bits of peanut in it (don’t blend too much).

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I had only one fig left. With half I’ve cut nice slices. I’ve used the white parts for the cream.

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The crust : In the blender, 2 tbs of oatmeal, a handful of peanuts. When it’s roughly powdered, add a cut prune, a little water, a pinch of salt. Blend into a sticky dough. Garnish a mold. Bake till dry, about 6 minutes at 160 degrees C in the oven toaster.

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Shikwasa is a small citrus from Okinawa. The size is about 1 centimeter of diameter. They are a little sour and extremely fragrant.

The cream : Without cleaning the blender, add the half of fig, 1/2 juice of shikwasa and a little grated zest, 2 tbs of silky tofu. Make a cream. Add a little prune to make it sweet to your taste.

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Asian breakfast : salmon okayu

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Second morning of okayu rice porridge with the leftover cooke for the umeboshi okayu

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The base is the same : brown rice + cooked aka endomame red peas + a little salt.

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Grilled salted salmon.

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With the salmon, I’ve toasted a few abura age (fried tofu). To make croutons for a Fall salad, with figs :

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The fish on top of the rice, with sesame seeds and shikwasa lime.

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Casser la croûte. On the table, at the farm…

Let’s break the bread crust and the meal starts… Casser la croûte, breaking the crust is eating for the French. That’s the magic : close your eyes. Your are in a French farm in the timeless era of fairy tales. There is a herd of unicorns grazing in the field…

Break the bread and put food on it…

That’s a meal. No, I forgot to take photos of the wine.
At our farm we make everything from scratch… but not the wine.

Un pain de campagne. Merci Kiki, la MAP (home bakery machine). It’s an old style peasant bread with a little rye flour in it.

3 terrines that you’ve seen before :
terrine de canard aux marrons et aux noix (chestnut marron duck )
terinne de volaille aux herbes (herb poultry)
pâté au foie (liver)

Salade de chou rouge (red cabbage).

Flavored with apple, Italian parsley (despite the name, it’s not foreign at all in France, it’s persil plat, the common flat parsley). Of course, a cider vinegar vinaigrette.

(to go to the posts, click on the text not the photos)

pickled cornichons

pots de pommes de terres et champignons (mushroom, potato)

Dessert chausson

I hope you enjoyed the visit !

Pink compote chaussons

More chaussons aux pommes. It’s good and it’s the season. They are different from those (click on text not photo) :

chausson au Japon

That was a white compote and croissant pastry dough.

It’s a simple puff pastry (without yeast).

The compote is pink because it’s made with a vivid red Fuji apple grated with its skin.

It is very fresh…

Enjoyed with Earl Grey tea. Autumn leaves ? No, not yet… my evergreen indoor plants lose leaves all the time.