Sakura an-pan, blossom sweet bread

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The sweet bread of the season is topped with a cherry blossom !

DSC07220-001 pickled sakura

It’s seasonal variation of anpan, a kashipan (Japanese sweet bread) filled with anko sweet bean paste. :

anpan

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A sweet bread dough : 1 ts of yeast, 3 tbs of kurozato black sugar, 2 cups of AP flour, enough tonyu (home-made soy milk) to wet that. I’ve mixed it in the home-bakery machine.
Filled with sakura an paste and shaped.

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DIY sakura bean paste (click here)

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Baked 20 minutes at 180 C. OK, the shapes are… what they are.

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Only one had a perfect aspect, but they were all delicious. I didn’t make enough.

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Red and fried snow pellets. Duet of savory arare rice crackers.

In Osaka it’s just snowing mochi.

あられ餅(霰餅) arare mochi.
Arare mochi are cubes of dried mochi of about 1 millimiter. So they look like graupels. Yes, you know graupels ? They are snow pellets.
Arare means “snow pellets / graupels “. OK, I’m not sure what it is exactly, it’s a snow amount, bigger than a snow flake and smaller than an avalanche…
And that also the name of the arare rice crackers made with these cubes.

We can buy them, but I made mines from a block of mochi (see here).

When they are dry, you can fry them. That takes a few seconds till they triple of volume, then take color.

They are very crunchy. You can eat them like that, for the nice taste of fried rice. Or flavor them :

I’ve mixed hot chili (togarashi) and also mild paprika to moderate the fire. And a little salt. Just roll them in the spices.

It’s transparent. It’s “wasabi powder” .

More here.

So you get a set of home-made salty crackers. You can keep them a while… I imagine.

Simple nori okaki. Make your own Japanese rice crackers.

They are called okaki or sembei, and there are other names. Japanese rice crackers have been widely exported and they now have fans all over the world. It’s possible to make yours.

DRY MOCHI

You need dried mochi for this recipe. I guess it’s not so easy to find outside Japan If you can’t get them, just mochi rice blocks like this :

all about mochi

You can probably find some in most Asian stores.

Cut thin slices of mochi and let them dry in a room not too hot (it’s easy to find when you don’t heat your place in this season…). If you don’t see the difference :

Some are broken, they really look dryer. That took 3 days. That depends on weather. There are people that hang them outside, like these :

noshi mochi(click here)

The advantage is the dried mochi can be kept a long time, they don’t get molds on them. Then when you want to eat them, you can grill or fry them.

OKAKI or SEMBEI (rice crackers) :

Click here for grilled okaki

Frying them is an easy, quick and tasty method :

The oil was quite hot (180 degrees Celcius). After one minute, they change of color. Turn them. That takes 2 minutes.

On paper to absorb the excess of oil. That’s all !

Casual presentation : I’ve cut ribbons of nori seaweed and sprinkled salt. But you can stick the nori on the crackers. Another day, we’ll do that. Store them in a metal box. Unless you want to eat them…

You will see what I did with the cubes soon…

Crack… crack… crack…

Chick crackers and others

Baking chick pea and almond salty crackers. Why ? Because it’s good and :

: Our July 2012 Daring Bakers’ Host was Dana McFarland and she challenged us to make homemade crackers! Dana showed us some techniques for making crackers and encouraged to use our creativity to make each cracker our own by using ingredients we love.

So for this challenge I’ve made :

egg sesame crackers
(online soon), pasta machine technique

Chick peas and almond crackers (making of below)

Crackers in previous posts on this blog :

red lentil 2 flavor crackers

nuka rice bran crackers

red lentil crisp bread

okaki (Japanese rice cracker from mochi)

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Making the chick pea crackers :

Chick pea cookies and crackers are usually made from chick pea flour (besan), but I don’t get it easily. I used soaked chick peas. I’ve added a little olive oil, salt, pepper, nutmeg.
The raw dough tasted good, but raw chick peas would give me… gas.

I pressed them like a tortilla and cut out when they were half-cooked.

I bake them and when they are half-hardened, I let them dry in the oven. I colored them in the oven-toaster.

The bits around are not lost. They feed the cook-photographer while writing the blog.

They are delicious nutty and crispy. They didn’t last long.

Les petites tartines

Tartine au misozuke tofu et au daikon kaiware (radish sprouts).
A tartine is just a slice of bread with something on it. Simple.

Graham flour and sesame bread. It’s a thick bread, a bit rustic. Perfect for that “cheese” tofu. The radish touch is interesting and crunchy. Miam !


read about misozuke tofu (fermented tofu)

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Tartine grillee au poireau “Kujo negi”, cheddar et poivre noir. Leek, cheddar, black pepper.

The bread is pistolet milk roll that were starting to become stale. (Post about pistolets )

They were still very fluffy inside, and great after toasting. Perfect hot sand, fresh and creamy.