O-cha-zuke… tea on rice.

Ochazuke, the Japanese tea soup.

Sarah from Simply Cooked was our November Daring Cooks’ hostess and she challenged us to create something truly unique in both taste and technique! Click here (later today) to see other challengers’ dishes and 3 recipes.

As you may know it, I already had a number of recipes with tea as an ingredient (don’t click on photos) :

click here for savory dishes with tea.
click here for sweets with tea.

That’s something people prepare quickly for a light dinner. Or after a long night of drinking, before letting the guests go back home, you feed them a hot bowl. There is a nasty story about it. People of Kyoto are said to be very well mannered, you know, so they avoid saying things directly and harshly. Hypocritical ? nah… Let’s say you are invited in their home, and after a while, they think you should leave, they won’t tell it. They will ask if you’d like to eat an ochazuke. And if you are polite, you say : “No, no, I am soooo sooooorry, but I have to leave now.”.

You need cooked rice (here genmai, brown rice) and stuff to garnish : sesame seeds, leaves of kikuna (chrysanthemum), ribbons of nori seaweed…

A small slice of salmon. It is salted, not smoked, not dry. We can buy it this way here. It can be kept longer than fresh but still needs refrigeration. No need to soak it, it’s not so salty. Just don’t add salt in the rest of the dish.
I grilled it under the broiler.

Tenkasu are crumbs of tempura.

Everything in the bowl…

Just pour hot Japanese green tea. This time I have a mix of sencha (green tea leaves) and matcha (green tea powder).

Matcha-cocoa ok’cake

Double pleasure for a double flavor okara cake : chocolate and matcha green tea.

A mix of chocolate ok’cake and matcha-matcha ok’cake.

The 2 flavors complete beautifully.

Matcha-matcha ok’cake

The okara (soy fiber) cake is become a regular guest here. I’ll call it ok’cake. Today double matcha (ceremony green tea) flavor. Greenly delicious.

chocolate ok’cake recipe
(click on text, not photo)

The recipe is the same as the guilt free chocolate ok’cake, with matcha tea powder instead of cocoa. Then on top, more matcha.
The okara I bought was slightly different from home-made, very dry. I had to put more egg and a water… maybe I put a little too much water. They took longer to bake.

It melts in the mouth…

Click here for other gourmande matcha delights…

Matcha and mango (via Gourmande in Osaka)

LY

Matcha and mango Matcha, the powdered green tea for ceremony and fresh mango… I had to try it. Verrine style : a layer of mango and lemon juice. A layer of cream (tofu, banana, vanilla, lemon). A roof of matcha. That was good, but not my favorite combination of tastes. Pour mes lecteurs francophones… s'ils existent : Si vous vous interessez au the japonais ou au the en general, ce blog est tres interessant. Ce jeune Francais a suivi la formation de "sommelier … Read More

via Gourmande in Osaka

Bubble matcha au lait

That’s refreshing and delicious. In addition the cafeine wakes you up from humidity induced torpor.

Cooked and refreshed pearls of tapioca.

Matcha green tea powder, whisked in ice-cold water.

Iced milk espuma.

Sugar ? Only the cute stars. The skim milk is naturally sweet.

With a wagashi Japanese tea cake (bought). It’s kashiwa-mochi colored green with yomogi. The leaf is not from “oak”, it’s an alternative version more common in Kansai.

Bouchons au Matcha (via Gourmande in Osaka)

Last year…

Bouchons au Matcha 18 bouchons Cal 334.4 F9.8g C54.4g P13.9g Dans les mini-moules a canneles, pate faite d'oeuf, farine, son de ble et the vert en poudre matcha. Dessus, sucre melange a du matcha. … Read More

via Gourmande in Osaka

Matcha and mango

Matcha, the powdered green tea for ceremony and fresh mango… I had to try it.

Verrine style : a layer of mango and lemon juice. A layer of cream (tofu, banana, vanilla, lemon).

A roof of matcha.

That was good, but not my favorite combination of tastes.

Pour mes lecteurs francophones… s’ils existent :
Si vous vous interessez au the japonais ou au the en general, ce blog est tres interessant. Ce jeune Francais a suivi la formation de “sommelier en the japonais”. Il explique tres bien, et ses infos sont verifiees, ce qui est rare. Bon, je ne suis pas la police du the, j’ai juste lu une centaine d’ouvrages sur le sujet et je me suis un peu baladee dans les vallons de theiers. Je trouve que dans ce qui est publie en francais sur internet ou sur papier, on lit des betises monumentales presentees comme des verites. Et aussi, si on consulte les Japonais, il ne faut pas oublier que certains sont de vrais mythos et qu’une partie des livres et essais sont des “nihonjinron” (ouvrages de folklores nationalistes, voire pire) et qu’il faut faire le tri entre la science, l’histoire et les legendes. Bref, bonne lecture.