Hot plate muffins with fig, walnut and cinnamon

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A few home-made English muffins. I made half plain, half garnished with dices of fresh fig, walnut and cinnamon powder.

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The dough is made with 1/3 graham flour and a little coconut milk. I shaped them in circles. Cooked on the cast iron hot plate.

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I’m in training. They will look more regular next time…

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They are still delicious the next day : toasted, with a little coconut cream. topped with more fig, walnut and cinnamon.

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Craditionnal trumpets. Nearly…

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Let’s make those bee wax textured British pancake. Not sure they are the real thing. That’s the easy way, but I will show you how you can fail them anyway… You need a circle (a heart, any shape) and the rest is probably in your pantry already.

Batter per crumpet :
1/2 cup (100 ml) of lukewarm coconut milk, 1/4 ts of yeast, 1/4 ts of sugar. When bubbly, 1/2 cup of flour, enough water to get a liquid cream. Blend. Cover.

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One hour later if it’s a hot day. A little salt, a few sprinkles of baking soda on top, stir slowly. Heat a pan or a hot plate.

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Grease a circle of about 8 cm wide. Grease it better than I did. Place it in the hot greased pan.

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Start on very low heat. Pour the dough till 3/4 of the mold.

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Cover. After 5 minutes, pass on low heat. Let 10 minutes.

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At this point, one side is done. Take away the circle. And flip. If you can…

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DRAMA ! Yep, the circle was not well greased.

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Rescue : I’ve saved it. Cook 2 more minutes.

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Done !

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The inside is fully crumpeted.

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Serve tea. You can do that later and toast the sliced crumpet to reheat it.

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Matcha tortilla tacos

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A Mexican-Japanese fusion dish. I’ve added Japanese matcha tea, azuki beans and rice to tacos.

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Azuki bean chili, with rice, green peppers, fresh thyme and dried tomatoes.

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Wheat flour tortillas with matcha green tea powder.

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Add a piece of steam corn cob. And wrap…

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Mawa cake with DIY mawa

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South Indian cardamom milk cake, made with mawa (unsweetened condensed milk).

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So that’s this month’s Daring Baker’s challenge.

Blog-checking lines: Aparna of My Diverse Kitchen was our August 2013 Daring Bakers’ hostess and she challenged us to make some amazing regional Indian desserts. The Mawa Cake, the Bolinhas de Coco cookies and the Masala cookies – beautifully spiced and delicious!

The detailed recipe is at the end of this post.

I also baked :
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Recipe in 1 line : Simmer and stir 1 liter of whole milk.
That’s true and that take ages. I have cheated, I’ve started with evaporated milk, then I had my mawa in 15 minutes.

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The baked cake.

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Let it cool.

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I found it better fully cooled, even chilled a few hours.

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Iced chai latte (Ceylon tea and cardamom infused in cold water and coconut milk, sprinkled with cinnamon).

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Recipe from the Daring Baker Challenge :

MAWA CAKE (Cardamom Flavoured Milk Cake):
Servings: Serves 8 to 10
Mawa Cakes are a specialty cake that is the hallmark of Irani cafés in India. The Iranis are Zoroastrians who left Persia/ Iran in the 19th and early 20th centuries to escape persecution of non-Muslims, and settled down and thrived here mostly in the cities of Mumbai, Hyderabad and Pune. They’re most famous in India for their friendly informal cafés/ restaurants that serve the most awesome food. The brun pav or maska pav(kinds of bread) with Irani chai (thick, strong, sweet and milky cardamom flavoured tea), their Shrewsbury biscuits and Mawa cakes are just a few of them.
Mawa (also known as Khoya/ Khoa) is made by slowly reducing milk (usually full-fat) until all that remain is a mass of slightly caramelized granular dough-like milk solids. Mawa is used in a wide variety of Indian sweets like Gulab Jamun and Peda, to mention just two. Mawa is pronounced as Maa-vaa; Khoya is pronounced as KhOh-yaa.
In this cake, Mawa lends a rich and a caramelized milky taste to this cake which is slightly dense and reminiscent of a pound cake. Cardamom and cashewnuts are typical of a Mawa Cake, though blanched almonds are also used. Mawa Cakes are also bakes as cupcakes.

The cake is very easy to make and the Mawa is not too difficult. It just requires some time, patience and a lot of stirring!

Ingredients

For the Mawa:
1 litre (4 cups) full fat milk

For the cake:
1/2 cup (1 stick) (120 ml) (4 oz) (115 gm) unsalted Butter (soft at room temperature)
3/4 cup (180 ml) packed crumbled mawa
1-1/4 cups (300 ml) (10 oz) (280 gm) castor sugar
3 large eggs
5 to 6 cardamom pods, powdered, (about 1-1/2 tsp powdered cardamom)
2 cups (500ml) (9 oz) (260 gm) cake flour
1 teaspoon (5 ml) (5 gm) baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup (120 ml) milk
Cashewnuts (or blanched almonds) to decorate (about 18 to 20)

Directions:
1. First make the “Mawa”. Pour the milk into a heavy bottomed saucepan, preferably a non-stick one. Bring the milk to a boil, stirring it on and off, making sure it doesn’t stick to the bottom.
Turn down the heat to medium and keep cooking the milk until reduces to about a quarter of its original volume. This should take about an hour to an hour and a half.
2. The important thing during this process is to watch the milk and stir it frequently to make sure it doesn’t stick to the sides or bottom of the pan and get burnt. The danger of this happening increases as the milk reduces and gets thicker.
3. Once the milk it has reduced to about one fourth, 1/4 quantity, lower the heat to low and let cook for a little while longer. Keep stirring regularly, until the milk solids (mawa) take on a lumpy appearance. There should be no visible liquid left in the pan, but the mawa should be moist and not stick to the sides of the pan.
4. Remove the pan from heat and transfer the mawa to a bowl and let it cool completely. Then cover and refrigerate it for a day or two (not more) till you’re ready to make the cake. It will harden in the fridge so let it come to room temperature before using it.
You should get about 3/4 to 1 cup of mawa from 1 litre (4 cups) of full-fat milk.

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5. Now start preparations for the cake by pre-heating your oven to moderate 180°C/350°F/gas mark 4. Beat the butter, the crumbled mawa and the sugar in a largish bowl, using a hand held electric beater, on high speed until soft and fluffy.
6. Add the eggs, one at a time, and beat on medium speed till well incorporated. Add the vanilla and milk and beat till mixed well.
7. Sift the cake flour, baking powder, cardamom, and salt onto the batter and beat at medium speed and well blended. If you cannot find cake flour, place 2 tablespoon of cornstarch in the bottom of your 1-cup measure and then fill it with all-purpose (plain) flour to make up to 1 cup.
8. Grease and line only the bottom of an 8 inch (20 cm) spring form pan. Pour the batter into this and lightly smooth the top. Place the cashew nuts (or blanched almonds) on top of the batter randomly. Do not press the nuts down into the batter. A Mawa Cake always has a rustic finished look rather than a decorated look.
9. Bake in a preheated moderate oven for about 1 hour until the cake is a golden brown and a skewer pushed into the centre comes out clean. Do not over bake the cake or it will dry out. If the cake seems to be browning too quickly, cover it will aluminium foil hallway through the baking time.
10. Remove from oven and allow it to cool for 10 min in the tin. Release the cake, peel off the parchment from the base and let it cool completely.

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Black soy milk iced matcha latte (from beans)

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That’s not a fast-food drink. Count 12 hours or more to get your refreshment. Well, it’s not really labor intensive.

Kuromame, black soy beans. Compil’ here.

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After overnight soaking. I don’t know why they burst. That doesn’t matter.

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Squeezed in cotton gauze. More details about soy milk making here.

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That gives soy milk. The grounds are okara:

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This okara will be used in next post.

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You can drink the milk.

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Or make a matcha latte. I foamed 1/3 of chilled milk with matcha green tea powder and poured on top. You can see a gradation.

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Mitarashi tokk

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Matcha and wagashi. Tea and cakes. That’s an informal tea ceremony with a Korean twist.
The model is mitarashi dango, skewers of mochi balls in a sweet sauce. But these are sticks…

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I’ve used Korean mochi (tokk). I have no idea if that exists elsewhere than in Osaka, but you can see this version here. It’s very convenient to prepare.

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Boiled them till soft (10 minutes).

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Put on skewers. Passed a little sesame oil around.

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Grilled the skewers.

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I’ve made a sauce by melting a small block of kurozato black sugar in water, adding a little soy sauce, a pinch of hot chili and a little potato starch to thicken.

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Reheated the sauce and painted the skewers with it.

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Served with matcha green tea.

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A vanilla scone pause

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Take a freshly baked fluffy vanilla scone, break it open…

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Add a little butter and raspberry jam… Mmmmmmmmm….

Classic scones with a generous pinch of vanilla powder in the dough.

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Yep, the shape is not very regular, but that doesn’t matter.
Scone recipe here.

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Brew tea.

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It’s my home-blend Thé de Noël (Christmas tea, recipe here).

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Ding, ding… tea time !

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