Tofu : tout !

Reblog from the “tofu page”

It’s compilation on the tofu topic…I add data regularly.

3 main tofu textures :

You have Japanese tofu that is :
kinu-dofu, silky tofu
momen-dofu, cotton tofu (translated as *firm tofu* in English)
Both are soft and watery. The first is very soft like egg pudding, the second is soft like starch pudding.
Really firm and dry tofu, the one that has a texture closer to meat is popular in China. It’s uncommon in Japan, except ….

Bottom line : If you like firm tofu…

Read more (click here)

Tofu and faux tofu

It’s compilation on the tofu topic…

Tofu is soy milk curded with nigari. But some other products not based on soy milk are called tofu because of their texture and appearance.
Tofu ? dofu ? toufu ? doufu ? The only proper spelling is 豆腐. It’s a matter of transcription. The “t” tends to become a “d” in second part of words in Japanese. And in Chinese it’s written “d” and you read “t”. And the “o” is long.

Choosing tofu :

There are huge differences of quality. It can be delicious or absolutely terrible. I wouldn’t want to eat again in this life time all the weirdly packaged tofus I have eaten in Europe and North-America. Maybe I had bad luck. Also in the US, the soy is GMO.

The second thing is you have to buy the right type.
Most Westerners don’t really understand the different types, and I’ve been there too. So maybe this can help. It’s a simplification, but start here :

3 main tofu textures :

You have Japanese tofu that is :
kinu-dofu, silky tofu
momen-dofu, cotton tofu (translated as *firm tofu* in English)
Both are soft and watery. The first is very soft like egg pudding, the second is soft like starch pudding.
Really firm and dry tofu, the one that has a texture closer to meat is popular in China. It’s uncommon in Japan, except in Okinawa, were Japanese and Chinese traditions cross their path. So here it is called 島豆腐 shima tofu, “island tofu“, and in Osaka, I have to buy in “ethnic stores”.
The 3 are made with different recipes.

Bottom line : If you like soft tofu, buy it from a Japanese maker (well, a maker making ingredients for Japanese cuisine as of course it’s not a question of nationality). If you like firm tofu, buy it from a Chinese or an Okinawan maker. Other Asian countries tend to make the firm varieties traditionally.

Gourmande’s home-made tofu :

Basic recipe :
ultra fresh torori tofu (from soy milk and nigari)

zaru-dofu (basket tofu)

Island tofu (very firm tofu)

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Gourmande’s home-made faux tofu

tamago dofu (egg tofu)

home-made sesame tofu (gomadofu)

yellow tofu or Shan tofu (from chick pea)

edamame tofu (from green soy beans)

Tofu bought in Osaka :

It’s a small sample. I can find many sorts. There are 3 tofu makers just in my street…

kinu-dofu (silky tofu)

momen-dofu (cotton tofu)

Okinawan tofu (super hard)

Yuzu tofu (citrus flavor)

koya-dofu (freeze dry tofu)

fresh yuba (sheets of tofu)

abura-age (usu-age type, fried sheets of tofu)

goma dofu (sesame flavored soy milk tofu)

goma dofu (sesame tofu, not a real tofu)

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RECIPES WITH TOFU
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dengaku (tofu skewers)

yudofu (Kyoto boiled tofu, hot pot)

mabo dofu (Sichuan style, several recipes)

age-dofu (fried tofu)

inari sushi (in abura age pockets)

champuru (Okinawan tofu with scramble egg)

chigae (Korean spicy tofu soup)

tofu steaks

u no hana (tofu fibers in tabouleh)

Tofu can also be an ingredient for desserts.

Squirrel udon, Osaka style kitsune

A classic Osaka Winter noodle bowl : kitsune udon
Kitsune means fox (not squirrel, as I wrote before). Udon are the thick and square sticky wheat noodles that marvellously keep the heat in chilly weather.

You can see thousands of standing restaurants in Osaka selling this dish at record low price (or not).

A few local udon restaurants and bars.

Window shopping.

It has the color of a fox (and of a squirrel) due to the beige abura-age (fried tofu). Actually names vary over Japan. Here it’s called kitsune, in other areas, I think it’s tanuki (Japanese forrest dog).

A wax model in a window.

Simple ingredients, very cheap and common here. Spinach, leeks, there could be other greens or seaweed.

Fresh udon. Dry doesn’t even look like it. If you can choose take it fresh or frozen. But you need to reboil it as it’s sticky when cooled.

Reboiled.

They have the perfect texture.

Abura-age, thin type (usu-age) is fried tofu. In a pan mix water, soy sauce and mirin, simmer it 5 minutes, let it 15 minutes.

Kezuri katsuo, flakes of dry bonito fish. Their infusion gives the dashi broth. I put them in small bags for tea. A tea ball (also called dashi ball here) can be used). Or nothing, and then you filter the broth.

When the dashi is done, squeeze the abura-age and add its broth to the dashi. Taste and see if your want a little more soy sauce or salt. Reheat.

Kamaboko (surimi fish cake) can be added. I had none, but I had shirasu baby fish. I added a little ginger (my taste too).

Pour the hot dashi. Top with raw negi leek (small type, not too strong to be eaten raw).
On the table, shichimi togarashi (7 spice mix) can be added.
Schlurp noisily while it’s hot !

Teratocuisine, it’s when you create a culinary monster. And it’s good !

I won’t hide you the truth : the aliens have landed in Osaka yesterday… On my window.

(photos from wikipedia and this blog )

This is the most idiot-proof recipe of sushi :
稲荷寿司 inari-zushi. Rice bag sushi.
I don’t know how popular their are abroad, but there are one of the most common sort here. Rectangle shape in Kanto (Tokyo), triangle in Kansai (Osaka). It’s a pocket of abura-age, usu-age (the thin ones) :

It’s fried tofu. It’s sold that way in tofu stores or the tofu shelf of larger shops. The thing is they make a few sorts… and today, I didn’t pick up those you need for inari-zushi.
So normally, you flatten your abura-age with a baker’s pin. Then you pass them in boiling water to clean a little the oil. And you simmer them in a sweet broth (classically dashi, mirin, soy sauce, sugar).

I don’t like mine too sweet, so it’s soy sauce, sake and skin of yuzu citrus.

Steamed good rice (koshihikari), add (black) vinegar sauce.
Inari-zushi are often very simple and vegan. I made some with sesame, and others with carrot (red kintoki carrot).
You mix. And you fill the pockets of abura-age.
EA-SY ! A 2 yr old can do that.

BUG !!!!! I was unable to open my abura-age in pockets. They are 1 layer. No way !
So the abura-age had to be wrapped around, or nothing.

A monster is born. Sushizilla !

A female…

A herd ? MUUUUUMMMM !!!! We are invaded !?

The shape… well. It didn’t affect the taste. Fried tofu + sushi rice is a magic pair.
They were really delicious with a few drops of soy sauce nama shoyu on the back and a little wasabi between the ears. With a good pot of genmai cha tea to reheat that.

4 pieces (= 2 servings of rice)
Cal 549.5 F17.8g C74.2g P19.8g

I took the photos outside for the light, that’s why you can see the street in the back.

Deep pan “pizza”


(Natural Christmas decorations)

Your oven is full, you have bread dough ready and a pizza craving… cook it in a pan :

On the dough, a sliced onion, herbes de Provence, abura-age and paprika. When it’s cooked, I added spinach, small green asparagus, melty cheese and shavings of parmesan. A few more minutes to melt the cheese. That’s ready.

About abura-age (usu-age)

Post-toppings are alfa-alfa and leftover dengaku miso mix.

Cal 617.5 F15.3g C90.2g P33.4g

Natto et abura-age tofu (recette du blog Shizuoka Gourmet)

La recette de mon joli papillon vient du blog de mon collegue gastronome franco-japonais : ici.

This is my rendition of the recipe of Shizuoka Gourmet blog : here.

Mon tofy frit “abura-age” semble different… et oui, il est vide. On en trouve en plusieurs epaisseurs. Epais c’est “atsu-age” et fin c’est “usu-age” et semi-fin….j’ai oublie. Celui d’Osaka est plus mousseux que celui que nous importons du pays de Kyoto.

My abura-age fried tofu seems different. As you see, it’s empty. It’s because we can find it in different thickness. Thick is “atsu-age”, thin “usu-age” and in middle does have a name. Osaka’s usu-age has a lighter texture than Kyoto’s. For hot recipes, I like Osaka’s, for cold, Kyoto’s.


Une delicieuse odeur qui n’est pas sans rappeler celle du fromage fondu envahit l’appartement et s’aventure dans les couleurs de l’immeuble, surement a la grande joie des voisins.
… et voi…

Ben non, schlurp…voila :

Ca se mange tres vite. Mon assaisonnement etait un filet de vinaigre noir, pour rafraichir un peu… car oui, c’etait tout pour moi.

Cal 258 F8.3g C19.5g P29.5g