A la recherche du baba de Stohrer…

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Maybe it looked like that…
I am not an historian, just playing the costumed dessert game. And I have really love this retro version that I made not very sweet. It’s much lighter and fresher than the average baba.

For recipes to bake the baba/kouglof : click here.

The oldest pastry shop in Paris

In the year of grace 1725, Louis XV married Marie Leszczynska,
daughter of King Stanislas of Poland.His pastry chef Stohrer follows her in Versailles.

Five years later, in 1730, NICOLAS STOHRER opened his bakery
at 51 rue Montorgueil in the second arrondissement of Paris.

In its kitchen, where desserts were invented for the Great Court,king’s delights are still prepared.

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Thanks to a dry Polish brioche, the King Stanislas had brought back from a trip, Nicolas STOHRER invented the BABA.

Un baba. Un kouglof.

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The inside. It’s good fresh, but yes very soon, it’s stale.

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He enhanced the dry brioche by basting Malaga wine, flavored by saffron

The amber syrup : white wine, brown sugar, orange peel and saffron. A little Brandy to punch it up.

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Did they serve crème anglaise (vanilla custard) as a side ? That was very popular. And the orange, if they could afford the precious exotic fruit.

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Matelotte de truite ayu

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A matelotte is a French river fish stew, with a creamy wine sauce. It’s out of fashion now, which is a shame. It’s really delicious. Well you need good river fish. When I was a kid, we often had neighbors that were emptying their fish pond, and we had some more often that we wished. Now it’s a rarity.

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Ayu is a type of small river trout. They are farmed, at least partially. It’s rarely if ever prepared this way.


Japanese ayu dish

I got a few that were a bit too large for Japanese style, but perfect for my purpose.

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Garniture aromatique. Fresh veggies and herbs in butter. The sauce is based on white wine.

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With lots of mushrooms.

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You can have reasonably healthy side dishes. Pink sauerkraut.

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Salade trévise (radicchio).

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A good Sunday meal.

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Aburi and amaguri, oregano seafood pasta

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Seafood pasta. I could eat some everyday. I know there are no pasta on this photo. I have not eaten them before shooting. They are under :

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Ballerina pasta alle vongole, bianco e oregano.
That’s the name in my kitchen. Don’t trust my skills at Italian language, but trust me to adapt the recipe to Japanese context.

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First, let’s prepare salmon. It’s salmon trout to be exact.

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Aburi sushi is midway between raw sashimi and grilled fish, so you get the great texture and the nice taste.
For more details on this technique :

aburi DIY (click here)

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hamaguri is a sort of local clam.

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First let them refresh in salty water.

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The hamaguri clams are opened in white wine with negi (green parts) and oregano. Then ballerina pasta are added and let 2 minutes with a covered lid, the time they swallow the flavors.

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The plate is crowned by bok choi, that was blanched with the pasta. I place the pasta in the middle, the seafood and more oregano on top. Black pepper and a drizzle on olive oil on top.
Mmmmm…..

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Rehearsal of a light réveillon

No Thanksgiving here, but from now, and for one month, every night is a party in Japan. Bonenkai : funerals of the old year. Then every night will be a party. Shinnenkai : birth party of the new year.
This is an advanced French Christmas dinner, quite light. Lots of seafood.

Blinis (like here), to go with smoked salmon.

Hors d’oeuvre and greens.

Choucroute au Champagne et fruits de mer.

Yes, you’ve already seen a fishy Sauerkraut on this blog (click here to get there) :

Lighter beurre blanc.

You’ll read about the cookies and the buche (log cake) in other posts.

White wine kaki gohan (oyster rice)

Oyster season is starting.
This is simple and delicious. The recipe is often made with Japanese sake. I had white wine, so a new variation was created. Both versions are delicious.

I used genmai brown rice. It’s very easy :
Cook the rice in the rice-cooker with 2 tbs of white wine, 1 tbs of mirin, 1 tbs of soy sauce and of course water.
Then open the cooker, mix in julienned negi leeks, put a few oysters on top. Close and let on “keep warm mode” 10 minutes.

Top with more negi leeks.

The oysters are perfectly warm not really cooked, at their best. The rice is delicately flavored. Add soy sauce to taste.