Modern yaki

DSC03639-001

Third dish of the hot plate fiesta at Emi’s. You’ve seen :
okonomiyaki and her yakisoba. Now we are mixing both.
That’s not something she usually does, but modan-yaki (modern yaki) is a regular offer in Osaka’s okonomiyaki places.

DSC03617-001

If you have a huge hot plate, you can make it all on it. Otherwise, you can stir-fry the noodles in a frying pan with pork breast and Worcester sauce.

DSC03624-001

Then on the plate, grill the noodles and more thin slices of pork belly.

2013-12-091

The batter-cabbage mix is the same as for okonomiyaki (more here).

DSC03629-001

Place pork on the noodles.

DSC03630-001

Cover with batter. Add tenkasu (tempura crumbs), pickled ginger and the rest of pork. Flip.

DSC03631-001

On the other side, add an egg.

DSC03633-001

Flip again.

DSC03637-001

Garnish with sauce, mayonnaise, fish flakes and aonori seaweeds.

Hot plate yakisoba with pickled ginger

DSC03644-001

Yakisoba, Japanese fried noodles. They are often made on the hot plate like their cousin okonomiyaki and actually that was the same day as this. Emi is the chef.
What gives flavor to the dish is often beni shooga, red pickled ginger. Look at this :

DSC03652-001

Emi’s homemade. You can see the ginger roots in vinegar with leaves of red shiso that bring the color.

DSC03619-001

The cut ginger.

DSC03643-001

Ingredients are common with okomiyaki : cabbage (cut in squares), pork breast… and it’s the same okonomiyaki/Worcester sauce. Add to this negi leeks.

DSC03645-001

And the noodles. They are home-made egg noodles.

DSC03646-001

Simple and delicious.

DSC03649-001

A moon filled of greens

DSC00107-001DSC00091-001

It’s shaped like a pupusa, but I think normally they are made of corn masa and filled with cheese. So this is a free style re-interpretation, I’ve just taken the shape. It’s very tasty, crispy and filling.

2013-09-301

The filling : miso + sakekasu (sake lees) and a little water to get a cream texture. Then minced onion, garlic and ginger. The greens are stalks of romanesco (diced) and cut kikuna (chrysanthemum greens)
The crust is likely to break a little, so the filling shouldn’t be too liquid.

2013-09-30

The dough is like for tortilla. Today : a mix of white and whole flour, chili flakes, black pepper, a little olive oil, hot water. I didn’t add salt as the filling is very salty already due to the miso. I cooked it in a frying pan without fat.

DSC00103-001

Garnished with sauce for okonomiyaki (a veggie Worcester sauce).

DSC00095-001

The nicest leaves of kikuna as a side salad with black rice vinegar and sesame oil.

DSC00098-001

Then cut and eat while hot.

DSC00110-001

DSC00111-001

Lacquered yakitori balls and grilled kabocha

DSC03883-001

Sauce tsukune.

DSC03884-001

Sesame tsukune.
Two more variation of tsukune (meat balls) of yakitori (grilled chicken skewer bars). For simple “salt” version, see here.

DSC03865-001

Yep, they are painted…

2013-06-11

The boiled balls (preparation here) are put on skewers, then painted several times with sauce, before, during and after being grilled under the broiler or on a brasero. I have not made my sauce, I’ve used the fruity Bulldog sauce (more here). Some yakitori shops use that, but most make their mix.
For the sesame ones, after 2 or 3 times, I stopped adding sauce but passed the skewer in a mix of white and black sesame seeds.

DSC03880-001

As I used the oven-toaster, I also grilled thin slices of kabocha pumpkin. Just like that, no salt, no oil. It’s delicious.

DSC03864-001

Vegetables (raw red onion, blanched and cooled okra and ninniku-no-me garlic stalks) and the leftover of creamy pesto dressing (preparation here). I mixed and let one hour.

DSC03870-001

Then 2 appetizers, I kept them “nature” without adding salt :

DSC03875-001

The seeds of kabocha, baked with the rest.

DSC03878-001

Edamame.

DSC03899-001

So I had a small casual dinner… well, that was a lunch.

other yakitori

DSC03889-001
DSC03902-001

Veg veg burgers, and Bulldog

DSC09673-001

DSC09701-001

DSC09706-001

Veg burgers again, but new ones. They are never the same.

2013-04-08

The carrot and romaine are the byproduct of juicing. I have added a little potato starch as a binder, and spicing is very light, salt, black pepper, a pinch of curry spices.

DSC09677-001

They had to be “lightly flavored”, because I have put some Bulldog sauce on them…

bulldog Bulldog sauces
That’s a brand of Worcester-like Japanese sauces, that is relatively classic now as they started in 1905 it seems. Click here and follow the arrows. It’s in Japanese but thanks to the photos, you can see the ingredients of the sauce, fruits, veggies and spices, plus vinegar and salt. The 3 sauces are relatively similar but more or less liquid. I have the 中濃 (chuno) which is medium thick.
Well, I should make mine someday. They are usually called “so-su” (sauce) in Japanese conversation, as that’s the sauce by default.

DSC09682-001

DSC09669-001

Heated rounds of bread to make sands.

DSC09652-001

DSC09714-001

Veggie and recycling : okara hamburg’

A “burger”, that the Japanese call hamburg’ or hanbaagu to differenciate them from the meat patties from the infamous fast-food chain.
It’s vegan and it’s “recycling” stuff. Yes, okara is a by-product of making tofu and it would only be discarded usually. That’s too bad as it’s full of healthy fibers, and I find it delicious.

The Daring Cooks’ February 2012 challenge was hosted by Audax & Lis and they chose to present Patties for their ease of construction, ingredients and deliciousness! We were given several recipes, and learned the different types of binders and cooking methods to produce our own tasty patties!

Read more.

I used 3 ingredients very common in Japan that may look a bit mysterious for European, American, African and South Pole readers of this blog. So look :

Okara

Soy bean fibers. How I make okara from dry soy beans

Konnyaku

It’s a root veggie that we buy cooked into blocks of different shaped, blocks or noodles. It has a firm jelly texture but it takes mostly the taste of the sauce. The good points : it’s nearly zero calorie per serving and it favors digestion. That’s really interesting here as it gives textures to very soft patties.

Hijiki

It’s a seaweed that you can buy fresh or dried.

I also used one dry shiitake mushroom, carrot, onion, flour (or starch).
Condiments : mirin (a syrup rice vinegar), soy sauce, salt.

Quantities : you will see and as you like.
Well, I mix about the same volume of veggies and okara and I count about 1/10th volume of flour per volume of okara. Then add enough liquid to get a paste you can form as patties.


Recipe :

-in a bowl, put water, the dry mushroom, the seaweeds (if they are dry). Let about 20 minutes. Keep the liquid, it will serve as a broth.
-grate the carrot, the onion. Cut the konnyaku in small cubes. Also cut the rehydrated mushroom.
-in a frying pan with a little oil, stir-fry the onion. Add in the other veggies. After 2 or 3 minutes add the okara and the broth. Add little mirin, soy sauce, salt to season lightly. Stir well. You get something quite dry. Take away from the stove.
-mix 1/4 flour and 3/4 water in a bowl, add to the previous mix.

-form patties in wet hands, sprinkle flour over them as you put them in a frying pan with hot oil. Cook both sides a few minutes.

To serve :
-brush the patties with Ikari Sauce (a cousin of the Worcester sauce), garnish with daikon radish (grated in paste) and sprouts of daikon radish.

And why not, a few leaves of crunchy ice plant ?