Red daikon, red mochi.

DSC03285-001

DSC03011-001

A colorful version of the Chinese snack that is called in Japan daikon mochi and I can’t pronounce any of its names in Chinese dialects… Well, radish cake.

DSC03257-001

I washed and grated my red skin daikon radish. It’s white inside as usual.

DSC03266-001

I steamed the daikon. Added an equivalent volume of mochiko (sticky rice flour) with enough water to get it creamy. For flavoring : salt, chili pepper flakes, dry shiitake mushroom, fish flakes (skip for vegan version). And fried slices of garlic.

DSC03267-001

I steamed the cakes. Let them chill.

DSC03290-001

Then pan-fried cuts of very cold cakes in sesame oil. They become creamy inside, crispy around. The flower is a slice of raw daikon.

DSC03274-001

For sauce : sweet chili sauce + Bulldog Worcester style sauce.

DSC03280-001

DSC03294-001

Champilège 2 : amuse-shiitake

DSC02037-001

DSC01998-001

Amuse-gueules are small stuff to entertain your snout. The hat of a shiitake is the perfect size.

DSC01999-001

Shiitake mushrooms.

DSC04248-001
Soaked bulgur is the base, with red onion, garlic, thyme, olive oil, salt, pepper…

DSC02035-001

Baked till golden. Serve hot.

DSC02036-001

Table tricolore. Three taboulés.

DSC04266-001
DSC04278-001

Too hot to cook… Let’s just mix, wait and eat.
Taboulé is the king of Summer.

DSC04248-001

Or couscous ? Both.
To make bulgur green tabouleh (click here).
For the couscous, I simply mix all the veggies, dressing (lemon juice, olive oil, salt, pepper, minced onion and garlic) to the dry grain. I complete liquid with water (for 1 cup of grain, 2 of liquid). I let at least 2 hours in the fridge.

DSC04274-001

Yellow.

DSC04288-001

Turmeric, raisins, red bell pepper, chick peas, herbs.

DSC04269-001

Red.

DSC04284-001

Tomato paste, chick peas, sweet corn, green bell peppers, herbs.

2013-06-016

Green.

DSC04285-001

Lots of fresh herbs. All the herbs I had that day (parsley, oregano, mint and a little lemon balm).

DSC04293-001

DSC04287-001

DSC04265-001

Namul, Koreanizing the veggies

DSC00644-001

Here is a plate generously filled with decadent veggies, and that’s only one serving. I don’t know why but when the Koreans prepare vegetables, they change them so much that I have the impression of eating dessert. But you never have too many veggies. So let’s make a ton !

They can be served as banchan (sides) or used to make a :

DSC00667-001 bibimbap (click here tomorrow)

DSC00653-001

The vegetables are raw or lightly cooked (blanched/steamed). I flavor them with fragrant sesame oil, soy sauce, grated garlic and dry chili. If I have some, a little grated yuzu zest doesn’t hurt. Then top with toasted sesame seeds. I try to use little salt, since I will eat a lot. Now there are many good low sodium soy sauces.

DSC00652-001

I’ve let these raw.

DSC00655-001

The greens of the turnip. I have steamed them slightly.

DSC00654-001

I’ve bought this sprouted soy bean kimchi.

DSC00607-001

ゼンマイ zenmai (osmunda japonica) is a type of fern often eaten as a vegetable in East Asia. We usually by them boiled. I just added sauce.

2013-04-232

Red and fried snow pellets. Duet of savory arare rice crackers.

In Osaka it’s just snowing mochi.

あられ餅(霰餅) arare mochi.
Arare mochi are cubes of dried mochi of about 1 millimiter. So they look like graupels. Yes, you know graupels ? They are snow pellets.
Arare means “snow pellets / graupels “. OK, I’m not sure what it is exactly, it’s a snow amount, bigger than a snow flake and smaller than an avalanche…
And that also the name of the arare rice crackers made with these cubes.

We can buy them, but I made mines from a block of mochi (see here).

When they are dry, you can fry them. That takes a few seconds till they triple of volume, then take color.

They are very crunchy. You can eat them like that, for the nice taste of fried rice. Or flavor them :

I’ve mixed hot chili (togarashi) and also mild paprika to moderate the fire. And a little salt. Just roll them in the spices.

It’s transparent. It’s “wasabi powder” .

More here.

So you get a set of home-made salty crackers. You can keep them a while… I imagine.

Accras la la…


Just bring accras and you’re starting a French Antilles style party. These appetizers bring the mood. They are fried dumplings with herbs, spices and often morue (cod fish).

With a dip of salsa ? I’d usually spice them enough and I eat them like that, but I often see many Japanese people looking for the sauce whenever that type of dish appears…

Delicious to photography…