New ginger carrot okara cookies

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I made these savory cookies to use leftovers. They ended up like heath store cookies, full of fibers and good nutrients.

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Carrot lees, what is left from juicing.

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Okara, the leftover from making tofu and soy milk.

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New ginger, still pink like a little baby. It’s available in Summer. Ginger pickles are made with it.

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Carrot + okara + minced ginger. I’ve added miso and powdered sesame for flavor, potato starch for binding.

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Spread on cooking paper, with more sesame seeds.

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After baking, they are still soft. The next day, they hardened and flavors have combined.

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Masala cookies

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My version of masala cookies, spicy savory Indian biscuits. I drifted away from the original recipe of the Daring Baker Challenge. I didn’t have all the ingredients.

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Mix. Chill. Spread. Chill. Cut. Bake.

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Keep a few for the photo…

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Sweet corn masala and tartelette a la mangue

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A fusion version of the Indian dal masala (lentil curry). Really quick and easy. And a gorgeous dessert.

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Stir-fried sweet corn with green soy beans and onion, The spices are a dal masala mix and turmeric.

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Added enoki mushrooms, and some greens (umaina). A little lemon juice.

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The earthiness of the soy beans.

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The sweet freshness of corn.

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With leftovers of dough for the gâteaux basques, I baked the crust of a tartelette and a few cookies. On the crust, big dices of mango. Plus a pinch of ground salt and hot chili. You have to try that, just a pinch on mango, and it enhances spectacularly the flavor of a fruit that is already delicious.
Great dessert.

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Fêtes . Dinners of Holiday. Many IDs, change of style.

A few ideas for holiday menus. Japan has a month to celebrate the end of the year with Bonenkai (funerals of the old year) parties. In other places, Yule, Noël, Xmas and New Year in many places. Add, yours…
I like trying different dishes and meal styles.

Take a hot cup of thé de Noël and enjoy :

Rétro Christmas, candlelight and rustic.

Simple appetizers.
Jambon en croute aux marrons (chestnut ham pie)
Provence’s style : 13 desserts of Christmas night
Nougat glacé (iced nougat)

Kani Nabe (crab hot pot)
Winter Japanese home parties are often nabe (hot-pots)
Japanese hot pot with Winter crab
Other nabe (hot pots) :
Nikomi Udon
Duck and veggie nabe
sukiyaki

Noël blanc
Everything white, and French flavors…
Full Menu White French Christmas
Boudin blanc (white pudding sausage was little people’s Xmas treat, DIY)
Blanc-Manger (Middle-Age style, not a dessert)
Canard aux airelles (duck with cranberry sauce)
Gateau Mont-Blanc (coconut Antilles’ whiteness)

A Japanese Christmas menu
chicken and sesame cooking class
marmalade and sesame wings
chicken slices with wine sesame sauce
tofu with wine sesame sauce
decorative potato sarada. (pote sarada)
sesame fruit cake

Mexican Navidad, Tamales
pickles and chicken tamales
yellow grits tamales
tamale pie

Islands
Christmas ham, from the Antilles (French Caribbean islands).
Petit jambon antillais (pineapple baked ham)
féroce d’avocat (cod fish spicy guacamole)

Classic French
potage Choisy
Le poulet de Gaston – Dijon chicken (mustard sauce)
bûche aux marrons glacés
Douceurs de beurre et marrons…

Osechi Ryori, a feast of good luck dishes for Japanese New Year, with the recipes. Click here.

Alsace influence. French and light.
Full Menu
Blinis with smoked salmon
Choucroute de la mer (seafood Sauerkraut)
Bûche forêt noire Blackforest log Yule cake
Bredele (season cookies)

Petit Jésus en brioche…
About this one, posts showing up soon :
Colorful first dish
Saucisson en brioche au safran (salami saffron pie)
Red wine red cabbage in rice cooker. The same in cocotte.
Chestnutty no-bake croquettes
Flocon de neige (streusel flocken-sahne). Berry Flockensahne.
Black sugar Nonnettes Kaki nonnettes. Mandarin nonnettes.

3 ingredients for natural cookies, and a blueberry tartelette


Here are very healthy snacks. No added sugar, vegan, soy and gluten free. That’s so perfect that could have been awful to taste. Hey no, they were delicious.

You need for the cookies :
-a banana
-rolled oats
-raw sesame seeds
Plus fresh blueberries for the tartelette.

-In a mill, paste 1/2 cup of raw sesame seeds into tahini. Reserve a tbs of it.
-Take a small banana, mash it. Mix in the tahini, then some the oats, not too many.

Small rounds for cookies. I sprinkled sesame seeds on them. The large one is for the tartelette.

After baking in the oven-toaster.
They are soft moist cookies with a nutty flavor.
On the large one, I’ve spread the reserved tahini and glued the blueberries with it.


Choco chip cookies made with coconut cream

It’s too hot for butter so I use coconut cream a lot. I tried to make cookies with it.

It’s a bit different in texture. The batter was a bit too liquid (it’s very hot here) and the first batch spread too much. I used mold for the second. But they are (were) all delicious.

I totally eyeballed the proportions. Same volume of cream and egg, sugar to taste and as much flour/powder as needed.

Peanuts and chocolate for the flat ones. Raisins and choc’ for the small ones. You may think I was not generous in chocolate, but it’s 100% cocoa mass, very strong. I put the maximum. More would be too much.

Yes, that was tough to make them pass the night to make daylight photos… Great breakfast !

Nazouk with 3 fragrances

Nazuk, nazook… so nazouk in French ? They are buttery vanilla flavored Armenian biscuits.

The Daring Bakers’ April 2012 challenge, hosted by Jason at Daily Candor, were two Armenian standards: nazook and nutmeg cake. Nazook is a layered yeasted dough pastry with a sweet filling, and nutmeg cake is a fragrant, nutty coffee-style cake.

More about it here.

I had never cooked anything Armenian, so that’s an interesting culinary trip.

I have not followed totally the given recipe as I have used ingredients I had to “cook or lose” in my fridge : vege cream and coconut butter for the pastry. And I have brushed with yogurt. Then you see that my technique is less expert than the Armenian aunt in the video. That’s my first try.

Filling 1 : butter and vanilla
Filling 2 : coconut butter and coconut flakes
Filling 3 : Butter and cinnamon

They are all delicious with coffee. I expected something softer like sweet bread, but they are more like cookie. They are very close to some kinds of vanilla bredele, Alsatian Christmas cookies.

Recipe from the challenge :

Nazook

Yields 40 pieces
Video instructions by aunt Aida

Ingredients
Pastry dough
3 cups (720 ml) (420 gm/15 oz) all-purpose (plain) flour, sifted
2½ teaspoons (12½ ml) (7 gm) (¼ oz) (1 packet) active dry yeast
1 cup (240 ml) (225 gm/8 oz) sour cream
1 cup (2 sticks) (240 ml) (225 gm/8 oz) softened butter (room temperature)

Filling
1 1/2 cups (360 ml) (210 gm) (7½ oz) all-purpose (plain) flour, sifted
1 1/2 cups (360 ml) (340 gm/12 oz) sugar
3/4 cup (1½ sticks) (180 ml) (170 gm/6 oz) softened butter (room temperature)
2 teaspoons (10 ml) vanilla extract

Wash
1-2 egg yolks (for the wash; alternatively, some yogurt, egg whites, or a whole egg)

Directions:

Make the Pastry Dough
1. Place the sifted flour into a large bowl.
2. Add the dry yeast, and mix it in.
3. Add the sour cream, and the softened butter.
4. Use your hands, or a standing mixer with a paddle attachment, to work it into a dough.
5. If using a standing mixer, switch to a dough hook. If making manually, continue to knead for about 10 minutes, or until the dough no longer sticks to the bowl or your hands. If it remains very sticky, add some flour, a little at a time.
6. Cover the dough and refrigerate for 3-5 hours, or overnight if you like.

Make the filling
7. Mix the flour, sugar, and the softened butter in a medium bowl.
8. Add the vanilla extract.
9. Mix the filling until it looks like clumpy, damp sand. It should not take long. Set aside.

Make the nazook
10. Preheat the oven to moderate 350°F/175°C/gas mark 4.
11. Cut the refrigerated dough into quarters.
12. Form one of the quarters into a ball. Dust your working surface with a little flour.
13. Roll out the dough into a large rectangle or oval. The dough should be thin, but not
transparent.

14. Spread 1/4 of the filling mixture across the rolled-out dough in an even layer. Try to spread the filling as close as possible to the edges on the short sides, but keep some of pastry dough uncovered (1 inch/2.5 cm) along the long edges.
15. From one of the long sides, start slowly rolling the dough across. Be careful to make sure the filling stays evenly distributed. Roll all the way across until you have a long, thin loaf.

16. Pat down the loaf with your palm and fingers so that it flattens out a bit (just a bit).
17. Apply your egg yolk wash with a pastry brush.

18. Use your crinkle cutter (or knife) to cut the loaf into 10 equally-sized pieces. Put onto an ungreased cookie sheet.

19. Place in a preheated moderate oven for about 30 minutes, until the tops are a rich, golden brown.

20. Allow to cool and enjoy!